Monthly Archives: July 2009

DHS Launches YouTube Channel and Redesigns DHS.gov

From the July 22, 2009 DHS Press Release:

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) today launched the DHS YouTube Channel and announced the redesign of DHS.gov—steps to enhance the Department’s web presence, increase transparency and provide accurate, up-to-date information to the public.

“Social media plays an increasingly large role in our engagement with the public, especially in the event of an incident or disaster,” said DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano. “These new tools will facilitate an open dialogue about the Department’s security efforts across the nation and around the world.”

The YouTube Channel, found at www.youtube.com/ushomelandsecurity, will allow DHS to use video to highlight events, speeches, public service announcements and other related content. DHS’s emphasis on web 2.0 tools such as YouTube allows the Department to provide greater transparency and access to the public and our state, local, territorial, tribal, private sector, and international partners.

DHS.gov was reorganized around Secretary Napolitano’s five major responsibilities—counterterrorism, border security, enforcement of immigration laws, disaster preparedness and response and Department unification—and redesigned based on user input and search analysis to help visitors find relevant and timely information.

Global Legal Studies: Recent Acquisitions

Elements of Crimes under International Law
Gideon Boas, James L. Bischoff, Natalie L. Reid
K5301 .B627 2008
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Freedom of Speech and Press: Exceptions to the First Amendment
Henry Cohen
KF4770 .C63 2008
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The International Politics of Judicial Intervention: Creating a More Just Order
Andrea Birdsall
KZ4017 .B57 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Investment Treaty Arbitration and International Law
edited by T.J. Grierson Weiler
K3829.8 .I58 2008
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Necessary Evil of Preventive Detention in the War on Terror: a Plan for a More Moderate and Sustainable Solution
Stephanie Cooper Blum
KF9430 .B48 2008 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Opening Markets for Trade in Services: Countries and Sectors in Bilateral and WTO Negotiations
edited by Juan A. Marchetti and Martin Roy
HD9980.5 .O64 2008
ThomCat | Amazon.com

U.S. International Investment Agreements
Kenneth J. Vandevelde [TJSL Faculty]
KF1575 .V365 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Library Highlights: Immigration Law

“Immigration is the sincerest form of flattery”

Jack Paar
Radio and television talk show host

El_NorteEl Norte: A Film by Gregory Nava
VIDEO PN1997 N678 2009

From the Publisher: Brother and sister Enrique and Rosa flee persecution at home in Guatemala and journey north, through Mexico and on to the United States, with the dream of starting a new life. It’s a story that happens every day, but until Gregory Nava’s groundbreaking El Norte (The North), the personal travails of immigrants crossing the border to America had never been shown in the movies with such urgent humanism. A work of social realism imbued with dreamlike imagery, El Norte is a lovingly rendered, heartbreaking story of hope and survival, which critic Roger Ebert called “a Grapes of Wrath for our time.”

Immig_Conseq_of_Criminal_ActivityImmigration Consequences of Criminal Activity: A Guide to Representing Foreign-born Defendants
Mary E. Kramer
KF4819 .K73 2008

From the Publisher: The Supreme Court and federal courts have issued incredibly important precedent decisions over the past several years that have drastically changed the immigration law landscape. Immigration Consequences of Criminal Activity by Mary E. Kramer is your one volume resource for providing knowledgeable and intelligent representation. With its easy-to-read style, the third edition provides step-by-step analysis of the most cutting-edge issues in criminal immigration law. In addition, the author combines in depth research and analysis with everyday experience in court, CIS, and detention centers.

Keeping_Out_the_OtherKeeping Out the Other: A Critical Introduction to Immigration Enforcement Today
edited by David C. Brotherton & Philip Kretsedemas
JV6483 .K44 2008

From the Publisher: America’s reputation for open immigration has always been accompanied by a desire to remove or discourage the migration of “undesirables.” […] Instead of finding effective ways of integrating newcomers into American society, the United States is focusing on making the process of citizenship more difficult, provoking major protests and unrest.

Brotherton and Kretsedemas provide a history and analysis of recent immigration enforcement in the United States, demonstrating that our current anti-immigration tendencies are not a knee-jerk reaction to the events of September 11. Rather, they have been gathering steam for decades. With contributions from social scientists, policy analysts, legal experts, community organizers, and journalists, the volume critically examines the discourse that has framed the question of immigration enforcement for the general public. It also explores the politics and practice of deportation, new forms of immigrant profiling, relevant case law, and antiterrorist operations. Some contributors couch their critiques in an appeal to constitutional law and the defense of civil liberties. Others draw on the theories of structural inequality and institutional discrimination. These diverse perspectives stimulate new ways of thinking about the issue of immigration enforcement, proving that “security” has more to do with improving legal rights, social mobility, and the well-being of all U.S. residents than keeping out the “other.”

Illegal_PeopleIllegal People: How Globalization Creates Migration and Criminalizes Immigrants
David Bacon
HD8081.A5 B33 2008

From the Publisher: For two decades veteran photojournalist David Bacon has documented the connections between labor, migration, and the global economy. In Illegal People Bacon explores the human side of globalization, exposing the many ways it uproots people in Latin America and Asia, driving them to migrate. At the same time, U.S. immigration policy makes the labor of those displaced people a crime in the United States. Illegal People explains why our national policy produces even more displacement, more migration, more immigration raids, and a more divided, polarized society.

In particular, he analyzes NAFTA’s corporate tilt as a cause of displacement and migration from Mexico and shows how criminalizing immigrant labor benefits employers. For example, Bacon explains that, pre- NAFTA, Oaxacan corn farmers received subsidies for their crops. State-owned CONASUPO markets turned the corn into tortillas and sold them, along with milk and other basic foodstuffs, at low, subsidized prices in cities. Post-NAFTA, several things happened: the Mexican government was forced to end its subsidies for corn, which meant that farmers couldn’t afford to produce it; the CONASUPO system was dissolved; and cheap U.S. corn flooded the Mexican market, driving the price of corn sharply down. Because Oaxacan farming families can’t sell enough corn to buy food and supplies, many thousands migrate every year, making the perilous journey over the border into the United States only to be labeled “illegal” and to find that working itself has become, for them, a crime.

Bacon powerfully traces the development of illegal status back to slavery and shows the human cost of treating the indispensable labor of millions of migrants-and the migrants themselves-as illegal. Illegal People argues for a sea change in the way we think, debate, and legislate around issues of migration and globalization, making a compelling case for why we need to consider immigration and migration from a globalized human rights perspective.

Making_People_IllegalMaking People Illegal: What Globalization Means for Migration and Law
Catherine Dauvergne
K3274 .D38 2008

From the Publisher: This book examines the relationship between illegal migration and globalization. Under the pressures of globalizing forces, migration law is transformed into the last bastion of sovereignty. This explains the worldwide crackdown on extra-legal migration and informs the shape this crackdown is taking. It also means that migration law reflects key facets of globalization and addresses the central debates of globalization theory. This book looks at various migration law settings, asserting that differing but related globalization effects are discernable at each location. The “core samples” interrogated in the book are drawn from refugee law, illegal labor migration, human trafficking, security issues in migration law, and citizenship law. Special attention is paid to the roles played by the European Union and the United States in setting the terms of global engagement. The book’s conclusion considers what the rule of law contributes to transformed migration law.

Immigrant_RightsImmigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship
edited by Rachel Ida Buff
KF4819 .I49 2008

From the Publisher: Punctuated by marches across the United States in the spring of 2006, immigrant rights has reemerged as a significant and highly visible political issue. Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of U.S. Citizenship brings prominent activists and scholars together to examine the emergence and significance of the contemporary immigrant rights movement. Contributors place the contemporary immigrant rights movement in historical and comparative contexts by looking at the ways immigrants and their allies have staked claims to rights in the past, and by examining movements based in different communities around the United States. Scholars explain the evolution of immigration policy, and analyze current conflicts around issues of immigrant rights; activists engaged in the current movement document the ways in which coalitions have been built among immigrants from different nations, and between immigrant and native born peoples. The essays examine the ways in which questions of immigrant rights engage broader issues of identity, including gender, race, and sexuality.

Website Spotlight: MAPLight.org — making money/vote connections transparent

MAPLight.org‘s mission is to “illuminate the connection between money and politics in unprecedented ways.” The organization aims to “give citizens the tools to find out for themselves how campaign contributions affect the specific issues they care about.” Watch this 6 mins. video to learn how it works.

Some articles and other items about MAPLight.org:

Shedding New Light on Lawmakers’ Voting Records (interview on KQED) (June 18, 2009)

Mapping a better world (The Economist) (June 4, 2009)

The People’s Data (Newsweek) (February 28, 2009)

The Citizen Watchdogs of Web 2.0 (Time) (June 30, 2008)

MAPLight gets its data from:

Law, Technology & Communications – New Acquisitions

Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future
Bill McKibben
HD75 .M353 2008
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Water on Wall Street
Frank Partnoy
HG6024.U6 P37 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

FORECITE California: Latest Developments in CALCRIM and CALJIC
Thomas Lundy
KFC1171 .F67 2006
ThomCat

Good Capitalism, Bad Capitalism, and the Economics of Growth and Prosperity
William J. Baumol, Robert E. Litan, Carl J. Schramm
HB501 .B372 2007
ThomCat  | Amazon.com

Intangible Cultural Heritage and Intellectual Property: Communities, Cultural Diversity and Sustainable Development
edited by Toshiyuki Kono
K3791 .I55 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The International Politics of Judicial Intervention: Creating a More Just Order
Andrea Birdsall
KZ4017 .B57 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Issues in Competition Law and Policy
Wayne Dale Collins
KF1649 .I87 2008
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Market, the State, and the Export-Import Bank of the United States, 1934-2000
William H. Becker, William M. McClenahan, Jr.
HG3754.U5 B43 2008
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Match King: Ivar Kreuger, the Financial Genius Behind a Century of Wall Street Scandals
Frank Partnoy
HD9660.M473 S864 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Necessary Evil of Preventive Detention in the War on Terror: a Plan for a More Moderate and Sustainable Solution
Stephanie Cooper Blum
KF9430 .B48 2008 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Political Determinants of Corporate Governance: Political Context, Corporate Impact
Mark J. Roe
HD2741 .R64 2006
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Take the Money and Run: Sovereign Wealth Funds and the Demise of American Prosperity
Eric C. Anderson
HG4910 .A713 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Trade and Investment Rule-making: The Role of Regional and Bilateral Agreements
edited by Stephen Woolcock
HF1418.7 .T723 2006
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Varieties of Capitalism: The Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage
edited by Peter A. Hall and David Soskice
HB501 .V355 2001
ThomCat | Amazon.com

TJSL Prof. Patrick Meyer, Law Firm Legal Research Requirements for New Attorneys on SSRN

Law Firm Legal Research Requirements for New Attorneys by Patrick Meyer, TJSL Associate Library Director & Adjunct Professor of Law is available on SSRN and has been downloaded 500+ times!

Find the article here

Abstract: This article collects in one place the results of previously published and unpublished surveys as they pertain to law firm research requirements of new hires. The article also summarizes results from the author’s recent law firm legal research survey, which determined what research functions, and in what formats, law firms require new hires to be proficient.

The article concludes that there is a need to integrate the teaching of online and print-based research resources for the following tasks: federal and state-specific legislative codes, secondary source materials, reporters, administrative codes and digests. There must also be a strong emphasis on the teaching of cost-effective research strategies.

Casemaker vs. Fastcase, A Comparison of Two Legal Research Services

from WEB WATCH: Casemaker vs. Fastcase by Robert J. Ambrogi:

Two legal research services are in a head-to-head competition to win the loyalty of America’s lawyers. No, I am not talking about Westlaw and LexisNexis. This battle is between Casemaker and Fastcase.  

Each markets itself as a member benefit to state and local bar associations. Casemaker has the bigger share of the market, with 28 bars representing 475,000 lawyers. But Fastcase is fast on its heels, with 17 state bars and other smaller bars representing 380,000 subscribers. Read more.