Category Archives: General

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The realities of bullying and how lawyers can help

The realities of bullying and how lawyers can help

-280,000 students are attacked monthly in high school.
-15 to 30 percent of students are bullies or victims.
-9 in 10 gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender students have been bullied.
-Victims of bullying are up to nine times more likely to think about suicide.
-Only 36 percent of bullying incidents are reported.
-3.7 million sixth- to 10th-graders will engage in bullying every year.
-Bullying is linked to 75 percent of shootings.

to read the entire article: http://www.americanbar.org/news/abanews/aba-news-archives/2014/04/the_realities_ofbul.html

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National Library Week is April 13-19, 2014

National Library Week is April 13-19, 2014

In the mid 1950’s, worried that Americans were spending less on books and more on televisions, the American Library Association (ALA) and its sponsors decided to annually observe National Library Week. The ALA believed “that once people were motivated to read, they would support and use libraries.” Each April since 1958, the ALA and libraries across the country have observed and participated in National Library week.

Next week, celebrate the contributions of your library! Join TJSL Library on the week-long full of fun, including: prizes for the most creative excuses for an overdue library book, cake, and a chance to win an Apple iPod Shuffle! Keep an eye out for an email with more details.

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Gambler Sues Casino for $500,000 Loss

Gambler Sues Casino for $500,000 Loss

Legal Research Mini-Classes at the Library

Come and spend a few minutes to refresh your research skills at our Library mini-classes, held in the Learning Center on the 4th Floor. Here is the class schedule for the rest of March:

Primary Material: Locating a Statute – Tuesday March 11, 11:30 am to 11:45 am

Primary Material: Locating a Case and Using a Digest – Tuesday March 11, 11:50 am to 12:15 pm

Secondary Material: American Law Reports – Thursday March 13, 11:30 am to 11:45 am

Digests – Thursday March 13, Noon to 12:15 pm

Databases – HeinOnline and OnLaw, Monday March 24, 11:30 am to 11:45 am

Databases – CALI – Wednesday March 26, 11:30 am to noon

Hope to see you there!

 

Meet Lisa Foster, our new Reference Librarian

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Lisa spent over 23 years as a practicing lawyer before starting a second career as a law librarian. Before joining TJSL she worked as a Deputy City Attorney for the San Diego City Attorney’s Office and as an Associate and Partner for the McDougal, Love, Eckis, Boehmer & Foley law firm, specializing in public agency law. While working for the McDougal firm she served as the City Attorney of Poway, and General Counsel for the Lakeside Fire Protection District, Julian-Cuyamaca Fire District, Borrego Water District and North County Dispatch Joint Powers Authority.  She has also worked as an intern and Librarian for San Diego Law Library.

She received her Juris Doctor from California Western School of Law, and will earn her Masters of Library and Information Science from the University of Washington in March 2014. She is an active member of the California Bar.

Please feel free to stop by the Reference Desk, Lisa’s office (Room 455), or email her at lfoster@tjsl.edu and she will be happy to provide you with research assistance.

Library Mini-Classes This Week

Make a very small investment of time for a very large return by attending the Library’s mini-classes this week, which will be held at the learning center on the 4th floor:

 “Primary Material: Locating a Case and Using a Digest.” Monday, March 3, 2014, 11:30 a.m. to noon. Learn about options for finding case law.

Primary Material: Locating a Statute.” Wednedsay, March 5, 2014, 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Learn about finding codes to help you with your research.

Tips on How to Research.” Friday, March 7, 2014, 11:30 a.m. to noon. Learn tips for organizing and analyzing your research.

 

 

 

Staff Recommendation Corner: “Because I said so!”

Because I said so

Title: Because I said so! : the truth behind the myths, tales and warnings every generation passes down to its kids

Author: Ken Jennings

Call Number: AG243 .J47 2012 (Popular Reading Collection, 4th floor)  

Reviewed by: Hadas Livnat

Review: Did you know that drinking 8 glasses of water a day can actually be BAD for you? Ken Jennings looks at common myths and parental “wisdom” to divine the truth behind them in short 0.5-1 page examination for each topic. An amusing, sometimes eye-opening read.

4/5 stars

Study Aids: Outlines, Questions & Answers, Flash Cards, Lectures on CD

Study aidsAs you prepare for your exams, remember that the library carries several different types of study aids including:

Books

Black letter Outlines such as the Emanuel series and Crunchtime series

Question & Answer Series

Understanding… Series

Ntushell Series

Recordings

PMBR

Course Lectures

Other Study Aids

Flash Cards

Online Exercises: CALI

Many of these Study Aids are located on the 4th Floor shelves facing the Circulation Desk.

If you want to know if the library carries a specific type of material. eg. Multiple choice questions on property or Outlines for Civil Procedure, ask at the Circulation Desk or the Reference Desk on the 4th floor.

The library also carries books on studying for law school exams.

Library Highlights: Sexuality and the Law

Intersexuality and the law

Intersexuality and the Law

Julie Greenberg

KF478.5 .G74 2012

From the Publisher: In Intersexuality and the Law, Julie A. Greenberg examines the role that legal institutions can play in protecting the rights of people with an intersex condition. She also explores the relationship between the intersex movement and other social justice movements that have effectively utilized legal strategies to challenge similar discriminatory practices. She discusses the feasibility of forming effective alliances and developing mutually beneficial legal arguments with feminists, LGBT organizations, and disability rights advocates to eradicate the discrimination suffered by these marginalized groups.

Loving v Virginia

Loving V. Virginia in a Post-Racial World

Kevin Noble Maillard

KF517 .L68 2012

From the Publisher: In 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that laws prohibiting interracial marriage were unconstitutional in Loving vs. Virginia. Although this case promotes marital freedom and racial equality, there are still significant legal and social barriers to the free formation of intimate relationships. Marriage continues to be the sole measure of commitment, mixed relationships continue to be rare, and same-sex marriage is only legal in 6 out of 50 states. Most discussion of Loving celebrates the symbolic dismantling of marital discrimination. This book, however, takes a more critical approach to ask how Loving has influenced the “loving” of America. How far have we come since then, and what effect did the case have on individual lives?

Geography of Love

The Geography of Love: Same-Sex Marriage & Relationship Recognition in America (the Story in Maps)

Peter Nicolas

KF539 .N52 2011

From the Publisher: There is no question that the most prominent gay rights issue in the United States today is the right to marry. Yet accurate, objective information about same-sex marriage and relationship recognition in the United States is difficult to come by. In this book, Seattle-based authors Peter Nicolas & Mike Strong combine their respective training in law and geography to depict the history and current state of marriage and relationship recognition rights for same-sex couples in the United States in words…and in maps.

Gender sexualities and the law

Gender, Sexualities and Law

Jackie Jones et al.

K644 .G459 2011

From the Publisher: This collection of essays offers an unrivalled examination of its various contemporary dimensions, focusing on: issues of theory and representation; violence, both national and international; reproduction and parenting; and partnership, sexuality, marriage and the family. Gender, Sexualities and Law will be invaluable for all those engaged in research and study of the law (and related fields) as a form of gendered power.

Courting change

Courting Change Queer Parents, Judges, and the Transformation of American Family Law

Kimberly D. Richman

KF540 .R53 2009 

From the Publisher: In Courting Change, Kimberly D. Richman zeros in on the nebulous realm of family law, one of the most indeterminate and discretionary areas of American law. She focuses on judicial decisions—both the outcomes and the rationales—and what they say about family, rights, sexual orientation, and who qualifies as a parent. Richman challenges prevailing notions that gay and lesbian parents and families are hurt by laws’ indeterminacy, arguing that, because family law is so loosely defined, it allows for the flexibility needed to respond to—and even facilitate — changes in how we conceive of family, parenting, and the role of sexual orientation in family law.

states of passion

States of Passion

Yvonne Zylan

KF9325 .Z85 2011

From the Publisher: Professor Yvonne Zylan explores the role of legal discourse in shaping sexual experience, sexual expression, and sexual identity. The book focuses on three topics: anti-gay hate crime laws, same-sex sexual harassment, and same-sex marriage, examining how sexuality is socially constructed through the institutionally-specific production of legal discourse.

Library Highlights: African Americans and the Law

It worked for me

It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership

Colin Powell

E840.5.P68 A3 2012

From the Publisher: It Worked for Me is filled with vivid experiences and lessons learned that have shaped the legendary public service career of the  four-star general and former Secretary of State Colin Powell. At its heart are Powell’s “Thirteen Rules”—notes he gathered over the years and that  now form the basis of his leadership presentations given throughout the world. Powell’s short but sweet rules—among them, “Get mad, then get over it” and “Share credit”—are illustrated by revealing personal stories that introduce and expand upon his principles for effective leadership: conviction, hard work, and, above all, respect for others. In work and in life, Powell writes, “it’s about how we touch and are touched by the people we meet. It’s all about the people.”

Courage to Hope

The Courage to Hope: How I Stood Up to the Politics of Fear

Shirley Sherrod and Catherine Whitney

E901.1.S54 A3 2012

From the Publisher: In this “inspiring memoir about the real power of courage and hope” (Kirkus Reviews), lifelong activist Shirley Sherrod explains why she was fired from the USDA under false charges and how she stood up against the politics of fear.

End of the pipeline

The End of the Pipeline: A Journey of Recognition for African Americans Entering the Legal Profession

Carla D. Pratt and Dorothy Evensen

KF299.A35 E94 2012

From the Publisher: This book had its beginnings in a simple question: How have some African-American attorneys, recently admitted to the bar, successfully navigated what research suggests is a very precarious pipeline to the legal profession? The response to this question entailed a journey that spanned some three years, over fifty informants, and a dozen or so researchers and scholars who study the intersections of education, race, and efforts to achieve social equity.

Moving Diversity Forward

Moving Diversity Forward: How to Go From Well-Meaning to Well-Doing

Verna A. Myers

KF300 .M94 2011

From the Publisher: “If you believe that your organization has done everything it can to enhance its diversity, and if you are still frustrated at how little progress you have made, Moving Diversity Forward is for you. It is an instructive read for all of those who wish to live and work in a multi-cultural world where everyone has a fair chance to succeed and contribute.”

parodies of ownership

Parodies of Ownership: Hip-Hop Aesthetics and Intellectual Property Law

Richard L. Schur

KF4757 .S38 2009

From the Publisher: Parodies of Ownership offers a broad analysis of post–Civil Rights era culture and provides the necessary context for understanding contemporary debates within American studies, African American studies, intellectual property law, African American literature, art history, and hip-hop studies. Weaving together law, literature, art, and music, Schur deftly clarifies the conceptual issues that unify contemporary African American culture, empowering this generation of artists, writers, and musicians to criticize how racism continues to affect our country.

Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Rebecca Skloot

RC265.6.L24 S55 2010

From the Publisher: Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. If you could pile all  HeLa cells ever grown onto a scale, they’d weigh more than 50 million metric tons—as much as a hundred Empire State Buildings. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions.