Category Archives: Copyright Law

Library Highlights: Law & Technology

I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy
Lori Andrews
HM851 .A66 2011
From the Publisher: Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time, empowering us in constantly evolving ways. We can all now be reporters, alerting the world to breaking news, participating in crowd-sourced scientific research, and helping the police solve crimes. Social networks have even helped to bring down governments, but they have also greatly accelerated the erosion of our personal privacy rights. As leading expert on social networks and privacy Lori Andrews shows through ground- breaking in-depth research and a host of stunning stories of abuses, as we work and chat and shop and date (and even sometimes have sex) over the Web, we are opening ourselves up to increasingly intrusive, relentless, and anonymous surveillance—by employers, schools, lawyers, the police, and aggressive data aggregator services that compile an astonishing amount of information about us and sell it to any and all takers. But the legal system cannot be counted on to protect us—in the thousands of cases brought to trial by those whose rights have been violated, judges have most often ruled against them. That is why in addition to providing the best expert advice about protecting ourselves, Andrews pro- poses that we must all become supporters of a Constitution for the Web, which she has drafted and introduces in this book. Now is the time to join her and take action—the very future of privacy is at stake.

Legal Aspects of Managing Technology
Lee B. Burgunder
KF1890.H53 B87 2011
From the Publisher: This book is designed for businesspersons working with technological innovations in any field, including business, management, computer science, engineering, architecture, biology, or law. It focuses on integral technology law topics with substantial attention paid to the wide range of controversial issues regarding intellectual property rights, and coverage of all other key topics such as e-commerce, privacy, antitrust, and biotechnology. Its goal is not to make readers legal experts; rather it is too allow managers to understand the fundamental legal issues pertinent to technology management so that they can competently create strategic plans in consultation with their attorneys.

That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back
Thomas L. Friedman and Michael Mandelbaum
BF408 .F747 2011
From the Publisher: In That Used to Be Us, Thomas L. Friedman, one of our most influential columnists, and Michael Mandelbaum, one of our leading foreign policy thinkers, offer both a wake-up call and a call to collective action. They analyze the four challenges we face—globalization, the revolution in in- formation technology, the nation’s chronic deficits, and our pattern of excessive energy consumption— and spell out what we need to do now to sustain the American dream and preserve American power in the world. They explain how the end of the Cold War blinded the nation to the need to address these issues seriously, and how China’s educational successes, industrial might, and technological prowess remind us of the ways in which “that used to be us.” They explain how the paralysis of our political sys- tem and the erosion of key American values have made it impossible for us to carry out the policies the country urgently needs.

The Real ID Act: Privacy and Government Surveillance
William Eyre
KF4791 .E97 2011
From the Publisher: Civil society in the United States in the 21st century has seen the abandonment of American concepts of individual freedom, privacy, expression and autonomy. Eyre ex- amines the Real ID Act in this context, as an example of laws passed since September 2001 restricting civil liberties. The Real ID Act facilitates the current and future surveillance regime. Real IDs and the database(s) to which they are linked represent a de facto national ID system facilitating monitoring citizens’ movements, speech and political activities when fully operational. The Real ID Act is examined as an unfunded mandate and vehicle for unconstitutional abridgement of First Amendment guarantees including political expression.

Computer Games and Virtual Worlds: a New Frontier in Intellectual Property Law
Ross A. Dannenberg … [et al.], editors.
KF3024.C6 C625 2010
From the Publisher: As the uses and ubiquity of video games and virtual worlds expand, the legal issues they raise grow more complex and commonplace. These issues include the traditional areas of intellectual property law, namely, copyright, trademark, patent and trade secrets, as affected by contractual issues arising from the end user licensing agreements (EULA) and terms of service (ToS) promulgated by each video game and virtual world proprietor. This book explores and discusses how to obtain these traditional rights in the non-traditional settings of video game and virtual world environments, and serves as a primer for legal practitioners researching these emerging legal issues. Each chapter addresses, in order, end user license agreements, copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets, as addressed by U.S. law. The book also includes a commentary on international legal issues stemming from the multi-national user-base and foreign operation of many virtual worlds.

Principles of Cybercrime
Jonathan Clough, Monash University, Victoria
K5215 .C58 2010
From the Publisher: We live in a digital age. The proliferation of digital technology, and the convergence of computing and communication devices, has transformed the way in which we socialize and do business. While overwhelmingly positive, there has also been a dark side to these developments. Proving the maxim that crime follows opportunity, virtually every advance has been accompanied by a corresponding niche to be exploited for criminal purposes; so-called ‘cybercrimes’. Whether it be fraud, child pornography, stalking, criminal copyright infringement or attacks on computers themselves, criminals will find ways to exploit new technology. The challenge for all countries is to ensure their criminal laws keep pace. The challenge is a global one, and much can be learned from the experience of other jurisdictions. Focusing on Australia, Canada, the UK and the US, this book provides a comprehensive analysis of the legal principles that apply to the prosecution of cybercrimes.

Class Action and Copyright: The Author’s Guild et al. v. Google Inc.

What does this case mean for us as users of Google Books?

“Judge Chin’s ruling changes little for Google users. About two million books that are in the public domain, such as works of William Shakespeare, currently can be viewed free on the Google Books site. They also are available through Google eBooks, a new online book store that allows people to purchase and read books on different devices.

Google Books users currently can view long previews of another two million books that are in copyright and in print, thanks to agreements between Google and tens of thousands of publishers that were separate from the legal settlement. Millions more books that are in copyright but out of print are currently available in Google Books in a shorter “snippet view.” Had the settlement been approved, users would have been able to see longer previews and potentially buy those books.” (Amir Efrati & Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg).

The settlement only affects a small portion of the books that Google makes available, “fewer than 10 million books of 174 million books in the world would be affected by the settlement, and that 5 million of those affected were out of print. Google has estimated that about 130 million titles would likely get into its digital library” (NYC Judge).

Judge Chin has ruled that Google should not be able to benefit from making copyrighted material available and searchable online without the permission of the copyright owner. Instead of permitting copyright owners to opt out, they should be allowed to opt in to the settlement agreement under which Google would: “pay $125 million to establish a registry to allow authors and publishers to register their works and get paid when their titles are viewed online” (Ashby Jones).

One issue that the Google books case has brought to the forefront is the need for an international legislative framework to address orphan works, that is, books whose copyright owners cannot be located. The proposed settlement would “let Google sell full access to copyrighted works that it otherwise would have no right to exploit” (Hillel Italie & Michael Liedtke).

It may take a while for such a framework to be crafted by the U.S and foreign legislators. In the meantime, “Google and the Author’s Guild could try to reach a new settlement” (Sydell).

However, another problem with the proposed settlement is that it would violate international law, as it would purport to allow Google to use without permission, intellectual property belonging to foreign nationals (Hillel Italie & Michael Liedtke).

Although the settlement has been rejected, it is still possible to search Google Books, and the public digital library project will still move forward. One benefit of the Google digitization project is the HathiTrust Digital Library, an online repository containing over 8 million works, mostly provided by Google. It is searchable using a Proquest search tool called Summon. (Steve Kolowich).

References

John C. Abell, The Catch-22 of Google Books, Reuters, Media File, Mar 28, 2011 available at http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2011/03/28/the-catch-22-of-google-books/

Melissa Block, Judge Rejects Google Books Deal, NPR, March 22, 2011, available at http://www.npr.org/2011/03/22/134771084/Judge-Rejects-Google-Books-Deal

Robert Darnton, Six Reasons Google Books Failed, The New York Review of Books, March 28, 2011, available at http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2011/mar/28/six-reasons-google-books-failed/

Robert Darnton, A Digital Library Better Than Google’s, The New York Times, March 23, 2011, available at http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/24/opinion/24darnton.html?_r=1

Amir Efrati and Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg, Judge Rejects Google Books Settlement, The Wall Street Journal,   MARCH 23, 2011, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704461304576216923562033348.html#ixzz1I1qb4qDr

Michael Hiltzik, Creating a digital public library without Google’s money, Los Angeles Times, March 25, 2011, available at http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-hiltzik-20110325,0,770127.column

Jennifer Howard, Research Libraries See Google Decision as Just a Bump on the Road to Widespread Digital Access, The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 23, 2011, available at http://chronicle.com/article/Google-Decision-Spurs-Research/126878/

Hillel Italie and Michael Liedtke, New York judge calls off plans for Google library, Associated Press, The Wall Street Journal, MARCH 22, 2011, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/APb6c1e8c8b65044bab15657863ff0568e.html?KEYWORDS=google+books#articleTabs%3Darticle

Ashby Jones, Banned Books? Judge Chin Shoots Down Google Pact With Publishers, Wall Street Journal Law Blog, March 22, 2011, available at http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2011/03/22/banned-books-judge-chin-shoots-down-google-pact-with-publishers/

The Associated Press, Judge Echoes Google Critics In Digital Book RulingMarch 23, 2011, available at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=134805170

Steve Kolowich, Google Who?, Inside Higher Ed, March 28, 2011, available at http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/03/28/usag

Associated Press, NYC judge rejects Google books settlement, March 22, 2011, http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fiw-google-library-20110322,0,2323688.story

Online books and copyright law, Editorial Board Opinion, Washington Post, available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/online-books-and-copyright-law/2011/03/25/AFTDt3kB_story.html

Eyder Peralta, Judge Rejects Book-Scanning Deal Between Google And Publishers, Authors, March 22, 2011, available at http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2011/03/22/134771196/judge-rejects-book-scanning-deal-between-google-and-publishers-authors

Laura Sydell, Google Hits A Snag In Digitizing World’s Books, NPR, March 23, 2011, available at http://www.npr.org/2011/03/23/134781916/google-hits-a-snag-in-digitizing-worlds-books

Library Highlights: Intellectual Property

Customs Enforcement: Protecting Intellectual Property Rights Across Borders

Timothy P. Trainer, Vicki E. Allums

KF2979 .T72 2010

From the Publisher: This book discusses border enforcement of intellectual property rights, including legal authority, standards, and procedures in the U.S. and other countries. It’s the only comprehensive source of how U.S. Customs protects intellectual property, and it also outlines what to look for in foreign systems. It clearly shows you how to use Customs as your first line of defense against infringing goods, and covers the legal authority to detain, seize, forfeit, and destroy goods. You’ll also find information on how to statutorily resolve Customs enforcement issues, answer infrastructure questions that foreign officials raise, and much more.

The Rhetoric of Intellectual Property: Copyright Law and the Regulation of Digital Culture

Jessica Reyman

KF2994 .R49 2010

From the Publisher: In recent years we have witnessed a rising tension between the open architecture of the Internet and legal restrictions for online activities. The impact of digital recording technologies and distributed file sharing systems has forever changed the expectations of everyday users with regard to digital information. At the same time, however, U.S. Copyright Law has shown a decided trend toward more restrictions over what we are able to do with digital materials. As a result, a gap has emerged between the reality of copyright law and the social reality of our everyday activities. Through an analysis of the competing rhetorical frameworks about copyright regulation in a digital age, this book shows how the stories told by active parties in the debate shape our cultural understanding of what is and is not acceptable in the use of copyrighted works on digital networks. Reyman posits recent legal developments as sites of conflict between competing value systems in our culture: one of control, relying heavily on comparisons of intellectual property to physical property, and emphasizing ownership, theft, and piracy, and the other a value of community, implementing new concepts such as that of an intellectual “commons,” and emphasizing exchange, collaboration, and responsibility to a public good. Reyman argues that the rhetoric of the digital copyright debate, namely the rhetorical positioning of technology as destructive to creative and intellectual production, has profound implications for the future of digital culture.

Property Outlaws: How Squatters, Pirates, and Protesters Improve the Law of Ownership

Eduardo Moisés Peñalver, Sonia K. Katyal

K721.5 .P445 2010

From the Publisher: Property Outlaws puts forth the intriguingly counterintuitive proposition that, in the case of both tangible and intellectual property law, disobedience can often lead to an improvement in legal regulation. The authors argue that in property law there is a tension between the competing demands of stability and dynamism, but its tendency is to become static and fall out of step with the needs of society. The authors employ wide-ranging examples of the behaviors of “property outlaws”— the trespasser, squatter, pirate, or file-sharer—to show how specific behaviors have induced legal innovation. They also delineate the similarities between the actions of property outlaws in the spheres of tan gible and intellectual property. An important conclusion of the book is that a dynamic between the activities of “property outlaws” and legal innovation should be cultivated in order to maintain this avenue of legal reform.

Re-thinking Intellectual Property: The Political Economy of Copyright Protection in the Digital Era

YiJun Tian

K1420.5 .T53 2009

From the Publisher: Copyright laws, along with other Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs), constitute the legal foundation for the “global knowledge-based economy” and copyright law now plays an increasingly important role in the creation of business fortunes, the access to and dissemination of knowledge, and human development in general.

This book examines major problems in the current IPR regime, particularly the copyright regime, in the context of digitization, knowledge economy, and globalization. The book contends that the final goals of IP law and policy-making are to enhance the progress of science and economic development, and the use and even-distribution of intellectual resource at the global level. By referring to major international IP consensus, recent developments in regional IP forums and the successful experiences of various countries,

YiJun Tian is able to provide specific theoretical, policy and legislative suggestions for addressing current copyright challenges. The book contends that each nation should strengthen the coordination of its IP protection and development strategies, adopt a more systematic and heterogeneous approach, and make IP theory, policy, specific legal mechanisms, marketing forces and all other available measures work collectively to deal with digital challenges and in a way that contributes to the establishment of a knowledge equilibrium international society.

Computer Games and Virtual Worlds:

A New Frontier in Intellectual Property Law

edited by Ross A. Dannenberg

KF3024.C6 C625 2010

From the Publisher: As the uses and ubiquity of video games and virtual worlds expand, the legal issues they raise grow more complex and commonplace. These issues include the traditional areas of intellectual property law, namely, copyright, trademark, patent and trade secrets, as affected by contractual issues arising from the end user licensing agreements (EULA) and terms of service (ToS) promulgated by each video game and virtual world proprietor. This book explores and discusses how to obtain these traditional rights in the non-traditional settings of video game and virtual world environments, and serves as a primer for legal practitioners researching these emerging legal issues. Each chapter addresses, in order, end user license agreements, copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets, as addressed by U.S. law. The book also includes a commentary on international legal issues stemming from the multi-national user-base and foreign operation of many virtual worlds.

IP and Antitrust: An Analysis of Antitrust Principles Applied to Intellectual Property Law

Herbert Hovenkamp … [et al.]

KF3116 .H68 2010

From the Publisher: IP and Antitrust: An Analysis of Antitrust Principles Applied to Intellectual Property Law, Second Edition is a two-volume reference that focuses on the intersection of the areas of IP and antitrust. While intellectual property licensing arrangements are typically pro-competitive, antitrust concerns may nonetheless arise. Licensing arrangements raise concerns under the antitrust laws if they are likely to adversely affect the prices, quantities, qualities or varieties of goods and services — either currently or potentially available. The Justice Department’s rekindled interest in intellectual property licensing arrangements now requires that companies factor antitrust considerations into the drafting and review of intellectual property licensing arrangements. Thus, licensing agreements involving intellectual property must now be drafted with two considerations in mind: maximizing the commercial value of intellectual property rights, and minimizing antitrust risks.

Law, Technology & Communications – Recent Acquisitions

Autonomy, Consent and the Law
Sheila A. M. McLean
K3611.I5 M38 2010
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The Challenge of Child Labour in International Law
Franziska Humbert
K1821 .H86 2009
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The Corporate Insider’s Guide to U.S. Patent Practice
Charles R. Macedo
KF3114.85 .M33 2010 (New Book Shelf)
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Global Employee Privacy and Data Security Law
Morrison & Foerster LLP; edited by Miriam H. Wugmeister and Christine E. Lyon
K3264.C65 G578 2009
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Going Solo in Tough Economic Times
State Bar of California
AUDIO KFC77 .G65 2009 (Lobby Display)
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The Handbook of European Intellectual Property Management : Developing, Managing and Protecting your Company’s Intellectual Property
Adam Jolly & Jeremy Philpott
KJE2636 .J65 2009
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Hate on the Net: Extremist Sites, Neo-fascism On-line, Electronic Jihad
Antonio Roversi, Lawrence Smith
HT1521 .R69 2008
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Intellectual Property Law and Interactive Media: Free for a Fee
Edward Lee Lamoureux … [et al.]
KF3030.1 .I578 2009
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Law and the Disordered: An Exploration in Mental Health, Law, and Politics
George C. Klein
KF3828 .K59 2009 (New Book Shelf)
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The Law of Virtual Worlds and Internet Social Networks
Andrew Sparrow
KD667.C65 S68 2010 (New Book Shelf)
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Moral Panics and the Copyright Wars
William Patry
K1420.5 .P376 2009 (New Book Shelf)
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The National Security Court System: A Natural Evolution of Justice in an Age of
Terror
Glenn Sulmasy
KF9223 .S85 2009
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Rediscovering Rhetoric: Law, Language, and the Practice of Persuasion
editors Justin T. Gleeson, Ruth C.A. Higgins
P301.5.P47 R43 2008
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The Soul of Creativity: Forging a Moral Rights Law for the United States
Roberta Rosenthal Kwall
KF3012 .K85 2010
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Virtual Freedom: Net Neutrality and Free Speech in the Internet Age
Dawn C. Nunziato
KF4772 .N86 2009
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Who Owns You?: The Corporate Gold-rush to Patent your Genes
David Koepsell
K1519.B54 K64 2009 (New Book Shelf)
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Law, Technology & Communications – Recent Acquisitions

Complinet
INTERNET
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Composition & Copyright: Perspectives on Teaching, Text-making, and Fair Use
edited by Steve Westbrook
KF3020 .C66 2009
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Endless Money: The Moral Hazards of Socialism
William W. Baker
HG230.3 .B354 2010
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International Law and the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction
Daniel H. Joyner
KZ5675 .J69 2009
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International Trade Law
Andrew T. Guzman, Joost H.B. Pauwelyn
K3943 .G896 2009
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IP Client Strategies in the EU: Leading Lawyers on Understanding European Intellectual Property Laws, Staying Ahead of Changing Regulations, and Developing IP Protection Strategies in a Global Economy
KJE2636 .I63 2009
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Pharmaceutical Industry Antitrust Handbook
KF3885 .P53 2009 (New Book Shelf)
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Private Equity Fund Exposure and Protection: Leading Lawyers on Weighing Investment Risks, Structuring Prudent M&A Transactions, and Preparing for Increased Government Involvement
K1116 .P75 2009
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Regulating Deviance: The Redirection of Criminalisation and the Futures of Criminal Law
edited by Bernadette McSherry, Alan Norrie and Simon Bronitt
K5015.4 .R44 2009
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The Software License Unveiled: How Legislation by License Controls Software Access
Douglas E. Phillips
K1443.C6 P48 2009 (New Book Shelf)
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State Agency and the Patenting of Life in International Law: Merchants and Missionaries in a Global Society
Bita Amani
K1519.B54 A74 2009
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State Antitrust Practice and Statutes
editorial board, Harvey I. Saferstein
KF1650 .S7 2009
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Why Do Governments Divest?: The Macroeconomics of Privatization
Alfred Schipke
HD3845.6 .S355 2001
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Library Highlights: Entertainment & the Law

Dealmaking in the Film & Television Industry: From Negotiations to Final Contracts
Mark Litwak
KF4290 .L58 2009
From the Publisher: Dealmaking—the popular, award-winning “self-defense” book for everyone working in the film and television industry—is now updated to include the latest legal rulings and entertainment technology developments. Addressing a general, non-attorney readership, it is a fascinating, highly accessible guide to current entertainment law’s peculiarities, “creative” practices, and practical applications.

The Miracle Case: Film Censorship and the Supreme Court
Laura Wittern-Keller and Raymond J. Haberski Jr.
KF4300 .W58 2008
From the Publisher: It was only a forty-minute foreign film, but it sparked a legal confrontation that has left its mark on America for more than half a century. Roberto Rossellini’s Il Miracolo (The Miracle) is deceptively simple: a demented peasant woman is seduced by a stranger she believes to be Saint Joseph, is socially ostracized for becoming pregnant out of wedlock, but is finally redeemed through motherhood. Although initially approved by state censors for screening in New York, the film was attacked as sacrilegious by the Catholic establishment, which convinced state officials to revoke distributor Joseph Burstyn’s license. In response, Burstyn fought back through the courts and won.

Laura Wittern-Keller and Raymond Haberski show how the Supreme Court’s unanimous 1952 ruling in Burstyn’s favor sparked a chain of litigation that eventually brought filmmaking under the protective umbrella of the First Amendment, overturning its long-outdated decision in Mutual v. Ohio (1915).

. . . More than the inside story of one case, this book explores the unique place that the movies occupy in American culture and the way that culture continues to be shaped by anxiety over the social power of movies. The Burstyn decision weakened the ability of state censorship boards and the Catholic Church to influence the types of films Americans were allowed to see. Consequently, the case signaled the rise of a new era in which films would be more mature and more controversial than ever before. Focusing on this single most important case in the jurisprudence surrounding motion picture expression, Wittern-Keller and Haberski add a significant new dimension to the story of cinema, censorship, and the history of First Amendment protections.

Music and Copyright
Ronald S. Rosen
KF3035 .R67 2008
From the Publisher: The highly topical area of copyright law, as applied to music, is widely misunderstood by lawyers, business people, and – perhaps most seriously – the federal judiciary. More than ever, there is a need to understand music infringement issues within the context of copyright litigation. In Music and Copyright, Ron Rosen provides readers with a practical and strategic roadmap to the music infringement litigation process, beginning with the client’s claim or defense and continuing through the selection and use of trial experts, discovery, motion practice, and trial.

Renowned for his expertise and career-long commitment to entertainment, intellectual property, and commercial litigation, Ron Rosen has condensed his experience into an essential guide for anyone involved in music-infringement litigation. Packed with elucidating examples from the author’s own practice, Music and Copyright navigates the often thorny terrain between notions of the legal and the musical providing practical advice, case studies, forms, and commentary along the way.

Entertainment Law & Business: A Guide to the Law and Business Practices of the Entertainment Industry
Jay Shanker, David E. Guinn, and Harold Orenstein
KF4290 .S53 2008
From the Publisher: Entertainment Law and Business is a handy resource for both the experienced and novice practitioner. It provides a broad survey of the entire industry and creative rights laws. It includes incisive summaries of all of the important areas of creative rights law: copyrights, the protection of ideas, trademark, publicity and privacy, and the major international treaties. It also provides an overview of all the major fields of entertainment (and related fields of interest for entertainment practitioners) along with illustrative agreements.

This is not an esoteric academic treatise. The book aims to aid the practitioner in the practical aspects of entertainment. Hence, the authors have attempted to highlight the key features of the major agreements in each field. They provide insights not only into what the individual provisions of the agreement attempts to regulate, but also the concerns that lie behind those provisions. They point to the types of negotiating strategies important in each agreement, passing on their experience to the practitioner.

Freedom of the Screen: Legal Challenges to State Film Censorship, 1915-1981
Laura Wittern-Keller
PN1995.62 .W58 2008
From the Publisher: At the turn of the twentieth century, the proliferation of movies attracted not only the attention of audiences across America but also the apprehensive eyes of government officials and special interest groups concerned about the messages disseminated by the silver screen. Between 1907 and 1926, seven states-New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Virginia, Kansas, Maryland, and Massachusetts-and more than one hundred cities authorized censors to suppress all images and messages considered inappropriate for American audiences […].

[S]ome industry outsiders, independent distributors who believed that movies deserved the free speech protections of the First Amendment, brought legal challenges to censorship at the state and local levels. Freedom of the Screen chronicles both the evolution of judicial attitudes toward film restriction and the plight of the individuals who fought for the right to deliver provocative and relevant movies to American audiences. As the fight against censorship progressed case by case through state courts and the U.S. Supreme Court, legal authorities and the public responded, growing increasingly sympathetic toward artistic freedom. Because a small, unorganized group of independent film distributors and exhibitors in midtwentieth-century America fought back against what they believed was the unconstitutional prior restraint of motion pictures, film after 1965 was able to follow a new path, maturing into an artistic medium for the communication of ideas, however controversial. Government censors would no longer control the content of America’s movie screens.

Music, Money, and Success: The Insider’s Guide to Making Money in the Music Business
Jeffrey Brabec & Todd Brabec
R673 ML3790 .B72 2008
From the Publisher: Songwriting, licensing, contracts, film & tv, composing, the internet, Broadway, recording and music publishing is a business. This book tells you how the business works… What you must know to succeed… and how much money you can make. The Brabecs, are former recording artists, entertainment lawyers, and legal services attorneys.

Law, Technology & Communications – New Acquisitions

Biotechnology & Nanotechnology: Regulation Under Environmental, Health, and Safety Laws
B. David Naidu
K3925.B56 N35 2009
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Copyright Law Deskbook
Robert W. Clarida
KF2995 .C54 2009
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Valuation and Dealmaking of Technology-based Intellectual Property: Principles, Methods, and Tools
Richard Razgaitis
KF3145 .R39 2009
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