Category Archives: Internet Law

Library Highlights: Law & Technology

I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy
Lori Andrews
HM851 .A66 2011
From the Publisher: Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time, empowering us in constantly evolving ways. We can all now be reporters, alerting the world to breaking news, participating in crowd-sourced scientific research, and helping the police solve crimes. Social networks have even helped to bring down governments, but they have also greatly accelerated the erosion of our personal privacy rights. As leading expert on social networks and privacy Lori Andrews shows through ground- breaking in-depth research and a host of stunning stories of abuses, as we work and chat and shop and date (and even sometimes have sex) over the Web, we are opening ourselves up to increasingly intrusive, relentless, and anonymous surveillance—by employers, schools, lawyers, the police, and aggressive data aggregator services that compile an astonishing amount of information about us and sell it to any and all takers. But the legal system cannot be counted on to protect us—in the thousands of cases brought to trial by those whose rights have been violated, judges have most often ruled against them. That is why in addition to providing the best expert advice about protecting ourselves, Andrews pro- poses that we must all become supporters of a Constitution for the Web, which she has drafted and introduces in this book. Now is the time to join her and take action—the very future of privacy is at stake.

Legal Aspects of Managing Technology
Lee B. Burgunder
KF1890.H53 B87 2011
From the Publisher: This book is designed for businesspersons working with technological innovations in any field, including business, management, computer science, engineering, architecture, biology, or law. It focuses on integral technology law topics with substantial attention paid to the wide range of controversial issues regarding intellectual property rights, and coverage of all other key topics such as e-commerce, privacy, antitrust, and biotechnology. Its goal is not to make readers legal experts; rather it is too allow managers to understand the fundamental legal issues pertinent to technology management so that they can competently create strategic plans in consultation with their attorneys.

That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back
Thomas L. Friedman and Michael Mandelbaum
BF408 .F747 2011
From the Publisher: In That Used to Be Us, Thomas L. Friedman, one of our most influential columnists, and Michael Mandelbaum, one of our leading foreign policy thinkers, offer both a wake-up call and a call to collective action. They analyze the four challenges we face—globalization, the revolution in in- formation technology, the nation’s chronic deficits, and our pattern of excessive energy consumption— and spell out what we need to do now to sustain the American dream and preserve American power in the world. They explain how the end of the Cold War blinded the nation to the need to address these issues seriously, and how China’s educational successes, industrial might, and technological prowess remind us of the ways in which “that used to be us.” They explain how the paralysis of our political sys- tem and the erosion of key American values have made it impossible for us to carry out the policies the country urgently needs.

The Real ID Act: Privacy and Government Surveillance
William Eyre
KF4791 .E97 2011
From the Publisher: Civil society in the United States in the 21st century has seen the abandonment of American concepts of individual freedom, privacy, expression and autonomy. Eyre ex- amines the Real ID Act in this context, as an example of laws passed since September 2001 restricting civil liberties. The Real ID Act facilitates the current and future surveillance regime. Real IDs and the database(s) to which they are linked represent a de facto national ID system facilitating monitoring citizens’ movements, speech and political activities when fully operational. The Real ID Act is examined as an unfunded mandate and vehicle for unconstitutional abridgement of First Amendment guarantees including political expression.

Computer Games and Virtual Worlds: a New Frontier in Intellectual Property Law
Ross A. Dannenberg … [et al.], editors.
KF3024.C6 C625 2010
From the Publisher: As the uses and ubiquity of video games and virtual worlds expand, the legal issues they raise grow more complex and commonplace. These issues include the traditional areas of intellectual property law, namely, copyright, trademark, patent and trade secrets, as affected by contractual issues arising from the end user licensing agreements (EULA) and terms of service (ToS) promulgated by each video game and virtual world proprietor. This book explores and discusses how to obtain these traditional rights in the non-traditional settings of video game and virtual world environments, and serves as a primer for legal practitioners researching these emerging legal issues. Each chapter addresses, in order, end user license agreements, copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets, as addressed by U.S. law. The book also includes a commentary on international legal issues stemming from the multi-national user-base and foreign operation of many virtual worlds.

Principles of Cybercrime
Jonathan Clough, Monash University, Victoria
K5215 .C58 2010
From the Publisher: We live in a digital age. The proliferation of digital technology, and the convergence of computing and communication devices, has transformed the way in which we socialize and do business. While overwhelmingly positive, there has also been a dark side to these developments. Proving the maxim that crime follows opportunity, virtually every advance has been accompanied by a corresponding niche to be exploited for criminal purposes; so-called ‘cybercrimes’. Whether it be fraud, child pornography, stalking, criminal copyright infringement or attacks on computers themselves, criminals will find ways to exploit new technology. The challenge for all countries is to ensure their criminal laws keep pace. The challenge is a global one, and much can be learned from the experience of other jurisdictions. Focusing on Australia, Canada, the UK and the US, this book provides a comprehensive analysis of the legal principles that apply to the prosecution of cybercrimes.

Center for Law, Technology & Communications

Digital Communications Law
Henry H. Perritt, Jr.
KF390.5.C6 P47 2010
ThomCat
Drafting Internet Agreements
Gregory J. Battersby, Charles W. Grimes, Leonard T. Nuara
KF905.C6 B38 2010
ThomCat | Amazon
Journal of Transportation Law, Logistics, and Policy
K10 .O899 (Legal Periodical Collection)
ThomCat

Money Laundering in the Real Estate Sector: Suspicious Properties
Brigitte Unger, Joras Ferwerda with a contribution from Hans Nelen, Luuk Ritzen
HV6768 .U54 2011
ThomCat | Amazon
Technology and Anti-Money Laundering: A Systems Theory and Risk-Based Approach
Dionysios S. Demetis
HV6768 .D46 2010
ThomCat | Amazon
The United States Government Internet Directory
edited by Peggy Garvin
ZA5075 .G68 (Reference)
ThomCat

Class Action and Copyright: The Author’s Guild et al. v. Google Inc.

What does this case mean for us as users of Google Books?

“Judge Chin’s ruling changes little for Google users. About two million books that are in the public domain, such as works of William Shakespeare, currently can be viewed free on the Google Books site. They also are available through Google eBooks, a new online book store that allows people to purchase and read books on different devices.

Google Books users currently can view long previews of another two million books that are in copyright and in print, thanks to agreements between Google and tens of thousands of publishers that were separate from the legal settlement. Millions more books that are in copyright but out of print are currently available in Google Books in a shorter “snippet view.” Had the settlement been approved, users would have been able to see longer previews and potentially buy those books.” (Amir Efrati & Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg).

The settlement only affects a small portion of the books that Google makes available, “fewer than 10 million books of 174 million books in the world would be affected by the settlement, and that 5 million of those affected were out of print. Google has estimated that about 130 million titles would likely get into its digital library” (NYC Judge).

Judge Chin has ruled that Google should not be able to benefit from making copyrighted material available and searchable online without the permission of the copyright owner. Instead of permitting copyright owners to opt out, they should be allowed to opt in to the settlement agreement under which Google would: “pay $125 million to establish a registry to allow authors and publishers to register their works and get paid when their titles are viewed online” (Ashby Jones).

One issue that the Google books case has brought to the forefront is the need for an international legislative framework to address orphan works, that is, books whose copyright owners cannot be located. The proposed settlement would “let Google sell full access to copyrighted works that it otherwise would have no right to exploit” (Hillel Italie & Michael Liedtke).

It may take a while for such a framework to be crafted by the U.S and foreign legislators. In the meantime, “Google and the Author’s Guild could try to reach a new settlement” (Sydell).

However, another problem with the proposed settlement is that it would violate international law, as it would purport to allow Google to use without permission, intellectual property belonging to foreign nationals (Hillel Italie & Michael Liedtke).

Although the settlement has been rejected, it is still possible to search Google Books, and the public digital library project will still move forward. One benefit of the Google digitization project is the HathiTrust Digital Library, an online repository containing over 8 million works, mostly provided by Google. It is searchable using a Proquest search tool called Summon. (Steve Kolowich).

References

John C. Abell, The Catch-22 of Google Books, Reuters, Media File, Mar 28, 2011 available at http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2011/03/28/the-catch-22-of-google-books/

Melissa Block, Judge Rejects Google Books Deal, NPR, March 22, 2011, available at http://www.npr.org/2011/03/22/134771084/Judge-Rejects-Google-Books-Deal

Robert Darnton, Six Reasons Google Books Failed, The New York Review of Books, March 28, 2011, available at http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2011/mar/28/six-reasons-google-books-failed/

Robert Darnton, A Digital Library Better Than Google’s, The New York Times, March 23, 2011, available at http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/24/opinion/24darnton.html?_r=1

Amir Efrati and Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg, Judge Rejects Google Books Settlement, The Wall Street Journal,   MARCH 23, 2011, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704461304576216923562033348.html#ixzz1I1qb4qDr

Michael Hiltzik, Creating a digital public library without Google’s money, Los Angeles Times, March 25, 2011, available at http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-hiltzik-20110325,0,770127.column

Jennifer Howard, Research Libraries See Google Decision as Just a Bump on the Road to Widespread Digital Access, The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 23, 2011, available at http://chronicle.com/article/Google-Decision-Spurs-Research/126878/

Hillel Italie and Michael Liedtke, New York judge calls off plans for Google library, Associated Press, The Wall Street Journal, MARCH 22, 2011, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/APb6c1e8c8b65044bab15657863ff0568e.html?KEYWORDS=google+books#articleTabs%3Darticle

Ashby Jones, Banned Books? Judge Chin Shoots Down Google Pact With Publishers, Wall Street Journal Law Blog, March 22, 2011, available at http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2011/03/22/banned-books-judge-chin-shoots-down-google-pact-with-publishers/

The Associated Press, Judge Echoes Google Critics In Digital Book RulingMarch 23, 2011, available at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=134805170

Steve Kolowich, Google Who?, Inside Higher Ed, March 28, 2011, available at http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/03/28/usag

Associated Press, NYC judge rejects Google books settlement, March 22, 2011, http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fiw-google-library-20110322,0,2323688.story

Online books and copyright law, Editorial Board Opinion, Washington Post, available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/online-books-and-copyright-law/2011/03/25/AFTDt3kB_story.html

Eyder Peralta, Judge Rejects Book-Scanning Deal Between Google And Publishers, Authors, March 22, 2011, available at http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2011/03/22/134771196/judge-rejects-book-scanning-deal-between-google-and-publishers-authors

Laura Sydell, Google Hits A Snag In Digitizing World’s Books, NPR, March 23, 2011, available at http://www.npr.org/2011/03/23/134781916/google-hits-a-snag-in-digitizing-worlds-books

Library Highlights: Intellectual Property

Customs Enforcement: Protecting Intellectual Property Rights Across Borders

Timothy P. Trainer, Vicki E. Allums

KF2979 .T72 2010

From the Publisher: This book discusses border enforcement of intellectual property rights, including legal authority, standards, and procedures in the U.S. and other countries. It’s the only comprehensive source of how U.S. Customs protects intellectual property, and it also outlines what to look for in foreign systems. It clearly shows you how to use Customs as your first line of defense against infringing goods, and covers the legal authority to detain, seize, forfeit, and destroy goods. You’ll also find information on how to statutorily resolve Customs enforcement issues, answer infrastructure questions that foreign officials raise, and much more.

The Rhetoric of Intellectual Property: Copyright Law and the Regulation of Digital Culture

Jessica Reyman

KF2994 .R49 2010

From the Publisher: In recent years we have witnessed a rising tension between the open architecture of the Internet and legal restrictions for online activities. The impact of digital recording technologies and distributed file sharing systems has forever changed the expectations of everyday users with regard to digital information. At the same time, however, U.S. Copyright Law has shown a decided trend toward more restrictions over what we are able to do with digital materials. As a result, a gap has emerged between the reality of copyright law and the social reality of our everyday activities. Through an analysis of the competing rhetorical frameworks about copyright regulation in a digital age, this book shows how the stories told by active parties in the debate shape our cultural understanding of what is and is not acceptable in the use of copyrighted works on digital networks. Reyman posits recent legal developments as sites of conflict between competing value systems in our culture: one of control, relying heavily on comparisons of intellectual property to physical property, and emphasizing ownership, theft, and piracy, and the other a value of community, implementing new concepts such as that of an intellectual “commons,” and emphasizing exchange, collaboration, and responsibility to a public good. Reyman argues that the rhetoric of the digital copyright debate, namely the rhetorical positioning of technology as destructive to creative and intellectual production, has profound implications for the future of digital culture.

Property Outlaws: How Squatters, Pirates, and Protesters Improve the Law of Ownership

Eduardo Moisés Peñalver, Sonia K. Katyal

K721.5 .P445 2010

From the Publisher: Property Outlaws puts forth the intriguingly counterintuitive proposition that, in the case of both tangible and intellectual property law, disobedience can often lead to an improvement in legal regulation. The authors argue that in property law there is a tension between the competing demands of stability and dynamism, but its tendency is to become static and fall out of step with the needs of society. The authors employ wide-ranging examples of the behaviors of “property outlaws”— the trespasser, squatter, pirate, or file-sharer—to show how specific behaviors have induced legal innovation. They also delineate the similarities between the actions of property outlaws in the spheres of tan gible and intellectual property. An important conclusion of the book is that a dynamic between the activities of “property outlaws” and legal innovation should be cultivated in order to maintain this avenue of legal reform.

Re-thinking Intellectual Property: The Political Economy of Copyright Protection in the Digital Era

YiJun Tian

K1420.5 .T53 2009

From the Publisher: Copyright laws, along with other Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs), constitute the legal foundation for the “global knowledge-based economy” and copyright law now plays an increasingly important role in the creation of business fortunes, the access to and dissemination of knowledge, and human development in general.

This book examines major problems in the current IPR regime, particularly the copyright regime, in the context of digitization, knowledge economy, and globalization. The book contends that the final goals of IP law and policy-making are to enhance the progress of science and economic development, and the use and even-distribution of intellectual resource at the global level. By referring to major international IP consensus, recent developments in regional IP forums and the successful experiences of various countries,

YiJun Tian is able to provide specific theoretical, policy and legislative suggestions for addressing current copyright challenges. The book contends that each nation should strengthen the coordination of its IP protection and development strategies, adopt a more systematic and heterogeneous approach, and make IP theory, policy, specific legal mechanisms, marketing forces and all other available measures work collectively to deal with digital challenges and in a way that contributes to the establishment of a knowledge equilibrium international society.

Computer Games and Virtual Worlds:

A New Frontier in Intellectual Property Law

edited by Ross A. Dannenberg

KF3024.C6 C625 2010

From the Publisher: As the uses and ubiquity of video games and virtual worlds expand, the legal issues they raise grow more complex and commonplace. These issues include the traditional areas of intellectual property law, namely, copyright, trademark, patent and trade secrets, as affected by contractual issues arising from the end user licensing agreements (EULA) and terms of service (ToS) promulgated by each video game and virtual world proprietor. This book explores and discusses how to obtain these traditional rights in the non-traditional settings of video game and virtual world environments, and serves as a primer for legal practitioners researching these emerging legal issues. Each chapter addresses, in order, end user license agreements, copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets, as addressed by U.S. law. The book also includes a commentary on international legal issues stemming from the multi-national user-base and foreign operation of many virtual worlds.

IP and Antitrust: An Analysis of Antitrust Principles Applied to Intellectual Property Law

Herbert Hovenkamp … [et al.]

KF3116 .H68 2010

From the Publisher: IP and Antitrust: An Analysis of Antitrust Principles Applied to Intellectual Property Law, Second Edition is a two-volume reference that focuses on the intersection of the areas of IP and antitrust. While intellectual property licensing arrangements are typically pro-competitive, antitrust concerns may nonetheless arise. Licensing arrangements raise concerns under the antitrust laws if they are likely to adversely affect the prices, quantities, qualities or varieties of goods and services — either currently or potentially available. The Justice Department’s rekindled interest in intellectual property licensing arrangements now requires that companies factor antitrust considerations into the drafting and review of intellectual property licensing arrangements. Thus, licensing agreements involving intellectual property must now be drafted with two considerations in mind: maximizing the commercial value of intellectual property rights, and minimizing antitrust risks.

Law, Technology & Communication — Recent Acquisitions

Civil Rights in Wartime: The Post-9/11 Sikh Experience
Dawinder S. Sidhu, Neha Singh Gohil
KF4755 .S543 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Community, Space and Online Censorship: Regulating Pornotopia
Scott Beattie
KU4220 .B43 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Justice for All: Challenges of the Mentally Ill in the Legal System
Sherrie Bourg Carter
KF480 .B68 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Law, Explanation and Analysis of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: Including Reconciliation Act Impact
CCH
KF1183 .A369 2010
ThomCat | Amazon.com

RIA’s Complete Analysis of the Tax and Benefits Provisions of the 2010 Health Care Act as Amended by the 2010 Health Care Reconciliation Act: with Code and ERISA Sections as Amended and Committee Reports
KF6276.62010 .A2 2010
ThomCat

The TRIPS Regime of Patent Rights

Nuno Pires de Carvalho
K1505 .C37 2010
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Law, Technology & Communications – Recent Acquisitions

Autonomy, Consent and the Law
Sheila A. M. McLean
K3611.I5 M38 2010
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Challenge of Child Labour in International Law
Franziska Humbert
K1821 .H86 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Corporate Insider’s Guide to U.S. Patent Practice
Charles R. Macedo
KF3114.85 .M33 2010 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Global Employee Privacy and Data Security Law
Morrison & Foerster LLP; edited by Miriam H. Wugmeister and Christine E. Lyon
K3264.C65 G578 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Going Solo in Tough Economic Times
State Bar of California
AUDIO KFC77 .G65 2009 (Lobby Display)
ThomCat

The Handbook of European Intellectual Property Management : Developing, Managing and Protecting your Company’s Intellectual Property
Adam Jolly & Jeremy Philpott
KJE2636 .J65 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Hate on the Net: Extremist Sites, Neo-fascism On-line, Electronic Jihad
Antonio Roversi, Lawrence Smith
HT1521 .R69 2008
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Intellectual Property Law and Interactive Media: Free for a Fee
Edward Lee Lamoureux … [et al.]
KF3030.1 .I578 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Law and the Disordered: An Exploration in Mental Health, Law, and Politics
George C. Klein
KF3828 .K59 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Law of Virtual Worlds and Internet Social Networks
Andrew Sparrow
KD667.C65 S68 2010 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Moral Panics and the Copyright Wars
William Patry
K1420.5 .P376 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The National Security Court System: A Natural Evolution of Justice in an Age of
Terror
Glenn Sulmasy
KF9223 .S85 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Rediscovering Rhetoric: Law, Language, and the Practice of Persuasion
editors Justin T. Gleeson, Ruth C.A. Higgins
P301.5.P47 R43 2008
ThomCat

The Soul of Creativity: Forging a Moral Rights Law for the United States
Roberta Rosenthal Kwall
KF3012 .K85 2010
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Virtual Freedom: Net Neutrality and Free Speech in the Internet Age
Dawn C. Nunziato
KF4772 .N86 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Who Owns You?: The Corporate Gold-rush to Patent your Genes
David Koepsell
K1519.B54 K64 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Library Highlights: Law & the Internet

Virtual Freedom: Net Neutrality and Free Speech in the Internet Age
Dawn C. Nunziato
KF4772 .N86 2009
From the Publisher: Communications giants like Google, Comcast, and AT&T enjoy increasingly unchecked control over speech. As providers of broadband access and Internet search engines, they can control online expression. Their online content restrictions – from obstructing e-mail to censoring cablecasts – are considered legal because of recent changes in free speech law. In this book, Dawn Nunziato criticizes recent changes in free speech law in which only the government need refrain from censoring speech, while companies are permitted to self-regulate. By enabling Internet providers to exercise control over content, the Supreme Court and the FCC have failed to protect the public’s right to access a broad diversity of content.

Nunziato argues that regulation is necessary to ensure the free flow of information and to render the First Amendment meaningful in the twenty-first century. This book offers an urgent call to action, recommending immediate steps to preserve our free speech rights online.

The Law of Virtual Worlds and Internet Social Networks
Andrew Sparrow
KD667.C65 S68 2010
From the Publisher: Virtual worlds are the latest manifestation of the internet’s inexorable appetite for development. Organisations of all kinds are enthusiastically pursuing the commercial opportunities offered by the growth of this phenomenon. But if you believe that there are no laws which govern internet social networks and virtual worlds this book will persuade you otherwise. There is law, and a good deal of it. Why would there not be?

As with many other aspects of the world wide web, this new medium is unregulated and offers many opportunities for companies to damage their reputation, run into a whole host of problems relating to intellectual property, trade marks and copyrights, and compromise the rights of individuals participating within the virtual environment. By reading The Law of Virtual Worlds and Internet Social Networks you will gain a good understanding of the legal issues which govern this expanding and fascinating world – are you ready for the leap from internet plaything to meaningful social and business tool? [this book] is an essential reference for advertising and media agencies; television broadcast producers; academic institutions including university law, knowledge and information departments. In fact, it has been written for anyone interested in virtual worlds and social networks whether commercially because you want to explore the possibilities such environments present, or for academic curiosity.

Internet Law in a Nutshell
Michael L. Rustad
KF390.5.C6 R87 2009
From the Publisher: The book begins with a review of the history, technology, and competing theories of the Internet that enables a deeper understanding of case law and statutory developments discussed in the substantive chapters. It covers the history of the Internet through the rapidly evolving Web 3.0, competing theories of Internet governance, cyber jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, choice and conflicts of law, cybertorts, online contracting and licensing, the protection of online intellectual property assets, the protection of online privacy, criminal liability for Internet activity, and European Community directives such as the E-Commerce Directive, Brussels Regulation, and Rome I Regulation.

In Search of Jefferson’s Moose: Notes on the State of Cyberspace
David G. Post
K564.C6 P67 2009
From the Publisher: In 1787, Thomas Jefferson, then the American Minister to France, had the “complete skeleton, skin & horns” of an American moose shipped to him in Paris and mounted in the lobby of his residence as a symbol of the vast possibilities contained in the strange and largely unexplored New World. Taking a cue from Jefferson’s efforts, David Post, one of the nation’s leading Internet scholars, here presents a pithy, colorful exploration of the still mostly undiscovered territory of cyberspace–what it is, how it works, and how it should be governed.

What law should the Internet have, and who should make it? What are we to do, and how are we to think, about online filesharing and copyright law, about Internet pornography and free speech, about controlling spam, and online gambling, and cyberterrorism, and the use of anonymous remailers, or the practice of telemedicine, or the online collection and dissemination of personal information? How can they be controlled?

Should they be controlled? And by whom? Post presents the Jeffersonian ideal–small selfgoverning units, loosely linked together as peers in groups of larger and larger size–as a model for the Internet and for cyberspace community self-governance. Deftly drawing on Jefferson’s writings on the New World in Notes on the State of Virginia , Post draws out the many similarities (and differences) between the two terrains, vividly describing how the Internet actually functions from a technological, legal, and social perspective as he uniquely applies Jefferson’s views on natural history, law, and governance in the New World to illuminate the complexities of cyberspace.

E-Commerce and Internet Law: Treatise with Forms
Ian C. Ballon
KF390.5.C6 B35 2009
From the Publisher: The revised and updated edition of this comprehensive work provides you with a complete legal authority on e-commerce and Internet law, covering business-to-business and business-to-customer issues, regulatory issues, and emerging trends. It includes practice tips and forms and its unique organization facilitates finding quick answers to your questions. This valuable resource on Internet and ecommerce issues contains nearly 10,000 detailed footnotes, plus references to more than 100 unpublished court decisions, many of which are not available anywhere else.

Privacy and the Internet: Your Expectations and Rights under the Law
Revised and updated by Margaret C. Jasper
KF1263.C65 J38 2009
From the Publisher: The Internet is the most significant medium of both commercial and financial communications and transactions. It has become the nation’s primary vehicle for the exchange of news, mail, and general information. Unfortunately, these benefits often expose Internet users to serious privacy risks which may have catastrophic results. Thus, it is crucial that Internet users understand how to safely and securely “surf the net,” without exposing themselves to criminal activities which infringe on their privacy.

This almanac discusses some of the most important security methods, including the effective use of passwords, utilizing virus software, installing firewalls, understanding encryption technology, and being vigilant about the type of information one shares on the Internet. Internet identity theft is also addressed.

In addition, this fully revised publication outlines Internet privacy policies and applicable laws placed upon various entities designed to protect private information of Internet users. A discussion of online privacy protection for children, which encompasses the governing laws are included. Finally, this almanac sets forth the role of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in enforcing privacy rights, including a review of some of the major enforcement cases brought by the FTC. The Appendix provides resource directories, applicable statutes, and other pertinent information and data. The Glossary contains definitions of the terms used throughout the almanac.