Category Archives: Privacy

Library Highlights: Privacy & The Law

Offensive Internet

The Offensive Internet: Speech, Privacy, and Reputation

Saul Levmore (Editor)

KF390.5.C6 O344 2010

From the Publisher: In a field still dominated by a frontier perspective, this book has the potential to be a real game changer. Armed with example after example of harassment in Internet chat rooms and forums, the authors detail some of the vile and hateful speech that the current combination of law and technology has bred. The facts are then treated to analysis and policy prescriptions. Read this book and you will never again see the Internet through rose-colored glasses.

Nothing to Hide

Nothing To Hide: The False Tradeoff Between Privacy and Security

Daniel J. Solove

KF1262 .S663 2011

From the Publisher: In this concise and accessible book, Solove exposes the fallacies of many pro-security arguments that have skewed law and policy to favor security at the expense of privacy. Protecting privacy isn’t fatal to security measures; it merely involves adequate oversight and regulation.

Real ID Act

The Real ID Act: Privacy and Government Surveillance

William Eyre

KF4791 .E97 2011

From the Publisher: Eyre examines the Real ID Act in this context, as an example of laws passed since September 2001 restricting civil liberties. The Real ID Act facilitates the current and future surveillance regime. Real IDs and the database(s) to which they are linked represent a de facto national ID system facilitating monitoring citizens’ movements, speech and political activities when fully operational.

I know who you are and I saw what you did

I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy

Andrews, Lori

HM851 .A66 2011

From the Publisher: As leading expert on social networks and privacy Lori Andrews shows, through groundbreaking in-depth research and a host of stunning stories of abuses, as we work and chat and shop and date (and even sometimes have sex) over the Web, we are opening ourselves up to increasingly intrusive, relentless, and anonymous surveillance—by employers, schools, lawyers, the police, and aggressive data aggregator services that compile an astonishing amount of information about us and sell it to any and all takers.

Privacy in Context

Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life

Helen Nissenbaum

JC596.2.U6 N57 2010

From the Publisher: Arguing that privacy concerns should not be limited solely to concern about control over personal information, Helen Nissenbaum counters that information ought to be distributed and protected according to norms governing distinct social contexts—whether it be workplace, health care, schools, or among family and friends. She warns that basic distinctions between public and private, informing many current privacy policies, in fact obscure more than they clarify.

Privacy a very short introduction

Privacy: A Very Short Introduction

Raymond Wacks

JC596 .W33 2010

From the Publisher: Legal expert Raymond Wacks here provides a compact introduction to this complex and controversial concept. He explores the tension between free speech and privacy which is often tested by paparazzi, with their intrusive journalism and sensational disclosures of the private lives of celebrities. He also looks at laws in many nations that regulate the collection and use of personal information, whether highly sensitive– medical and financial information–or commonplace

Library Highlights: Law & Technology

I Know Who You Are and I Saw What You Did: Social Networks and the Death of Privacy
Lori Andrews
HM851 .A66 2011
From the Publisher: Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time, empowering us in constantly evolving ways. We can all now be reporters, alerting the world to breaking news, participating in crowd-sourced scientific research, and helping the police solve crimes. Social networks have even helped to bring down governments, but they have also greatly accelerated the erosion of our personal privacy rights. As leading expert on social networks and privacy Lori Andrews shows through ground- breaking in-depth research and a host of stunning stories of abuses, as we work and chat and shop and date (and even sometimes have sex) over the Web, we are opening ourselves up to increasingly intrusive, relentless, and anonymous surveillance—by employers, schools, lawyers, the police, and aggressive data aggregator services that compile an astonishing amount of information about us and sell it to any and all takers. But the legal system cannot be counted on to protect us—in the thousands of cases brought to trial by those whose rights have been violated, judges have most often ruled against them. That is why in addition to providing the best expert advice about protecting ourselves, Andrews pro- poses that we must all become supporters of a Constitution for the Web, which she has drafted and introduces in this book. Now is the time to join her and take action—the very future of privacy is at stake.

Legal Aspects of Managing Technology
Lee B. Burgunder
KF1890.H53 B87 2011
From the Publisher: This book is designed for businesspersons working with technological innovations in any field, including business, management, computer science, engineering, architecture, biology, or law. It focuses on integral technology law topics with substantial attention paid to the wide range of controversial issues regarding intellectual property rights, and coverage of all other key topics such as e-commerce, privacy, antitrust, and biotechnology. Its goal is not to make readers legal experts; rather it is too allow managers to understand the fundamental legal issues pertinent to technology management so that they can competently create strategic plans in consultation with their attorneys.

That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back
Thomas L. Friedman and Michael Mandelbaum
BF408 .F747 2011
From the Publisher: In That Used to Be Us, Thomas L. Friedman, one of our most influential columnists, and Michael Mandelbaum, one of our leading foreign policy thinkers, offer both a wake-up call and a call to collective action. They analyze the four challenges we face—globalization, the revolution in in- formation technology, the nation’s chronic deficits, and our pattern of excessive energy consumption— and spell out what we need to do now to sustain the American dream and preserve American power in the world. They explain how the end of the Cold War blinded the nation to the need to address these issues seriously, and how China’s educational successes, industrial might, and technological prowess remind us of the ways in which “that used to be us.” They explain how the paralysis of our political sys- tem and the erosion of key American values have made it impossible for us to carry out the policies the country urgently needs.

The Real ID Act: Privacy and Government Surveillance
William Eyre
KF4791 .E97 2011
From the Publisher: Civil society in the United States in the 21st century has seen the abandonment of American concepts of individual freedom, privacy, expression and autonomy. Eyre ex- amines the Real ID Act in this context, as an example of laws passed since September 2001 restricting civil liberties. The Real ID Act facilitates the current and future surveillance regime. Real IDs and the database(s) to which they are linked represent a de facto national ID system facilitating monitoring citizens’ movements, speech and political activities when fully operational. The Real ID Act is examined as an unfunded mandate and vehicle for unconstitutional abridgement of First Amendment guarantees including political expression.

Computer Games and Virtual Worlds: a New Frontier in Intellectual Property Law
Ross A. Dannenberg … [et al.], editors.
KF3024.C6 C625 2010
From the Publisher: As the uses and ubiquity of video games and virtual worlds expand, the legal issues they raise grow more complex and commonplace. These issues include the traditional areas of intellectual property law, namely, copyright, trademark, patent and trade secrets, as affected by contractual issues arising from the end user licensing agreements (EULA) and terms of service (ToS) promulgated by each video game and virtual world proprietor. This book explores and discusses how to obtain these traditional rights in the non-traditional settings of video game and virtual world environments, and serves as a primer for legal practitioners researching these emerging legal issues. Each chapter addresses, in order, end user license agreements, copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets, as addressed by U.S. law. The book also includes a commentary on international legal issues stemming from the multi-national user-base and foreign operation of many virtual worlds.

Principles of Cybercrime
Jonathan Clough, Monash University, Victoria
K5215 .C58 2010
From the Publisher: We live in a digital age. The proliferation of digital technology, and the convergence of computing and communication devices, has transformed the way in which we socialize and do business. While overwhelmingly positive, there has also been a dark side to these developments. Proving the maxim that crime follows opportunity, virtually every advance has been accompanied by a corresponding niche to be exploited for criminal purposes; so-called ‘cybercrimes’. Whether it be fraud, child pornography, stalking, criminal copyright infringement or attacks on computers themselves, criminals will find ways to exploit new technology. The challenge for all countries is to ensure their criminal laws keep pace. The challenge is a global one, and much can be learned from the experience of other jurisdictions. Focusing on Australia, Canada, the UK and the US, this book provides a comprehensive analysis of the legal principles that apply to the prosecution of cybercrimes.

CA Legal News: Class Action Suit against Sony because of PlayStation Network Breach

What Happened?

Sometime between April 17 and April 19, 2011, hackers broke into the Playstation Network (Bloomberg). On Wednesday, April 20, 2011, Sony shut down the PlayStation Network and Qriocity services in response to the intrusion, but did not inform consumers of the intrusion. (Bloomberg; Seybold 04/26/2011).

Sony lacked the in-house expertise to evaluate the intrusion, but instead of informing consumers about the intrusion so that they might mitigate any possible damage, this information was kept secret.

By Tuesday,  Sony had “reported the breach to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in San Diego, which specializes in compute r crime”( Stelter & Bilton).  To provide the FBI with information about the case you can call the FBI headquarters at (202) 324-3000.” (Snider).

Although Sony executive Patrick Seybold, Sr. Director, Corporate Communications & Social Media, claims that they “Quickly [took] steps to enhance security and strengthen our network infrastructure” (Seybold). Journalists are questioning how “quick” Sony’s response was given the intrusion occurred around April 18th and clients were not informed about the possibility that their information was compromised until Tuesday April 26th (Theriault).

Moreover, consumers and journalists are not impressed with the fact that Sony did not already have a safe system, but instead waited for this intrusion before “re-building [their] system to provide [users] with greater protection of [their] personal information” (Seybold ). Even Senator Richard Blumenthal, contacted Sony, “saying he was troubled that the company had not notified customers sooner about the breach” (Ogg).

Should Users be Concerned?

Although Ann Carrns, blogging for the New York Times, claims that users should “remain calm”, what she actually means is that those consumers who used credit cards rather than debit cards and who regularly monitor their credit card statements and bank statements and can afford a “limited” debit card loss, should remain calm. Oh and anyway, these types of hackers, Carrns writes, “are often looking for notoriety, rather than to resell financial information” (Carrns).

Wall Street Journal blogger, Ben  Rooney, indicates that the type of data stolen is very valuable, “complete data including billing address, email addresses and personal information like dates of birth, represent the rich data that allow highly targeted attacks against individuals. This sort of data commands much higher prices—and is much sought after by cyber criminals” (Rooney).

“With the sort of data compromised it is possible for criminals to commit identity theft and use your details to open bank accounts, take out mobile phone contracts, and even re-direct your mail. Security professionals suggest obtaining a copy of your credit report which should give a complete account of your status as well as any searches against your credit history” (Rooney).

Graham Cluley, of naked security, the IT security blog of the year, explains how hackers could use the stolen information to “[b]reak into your other online accounts. We know that many people use the same password on multiple websites. So if your password was stolen from the Sony PlayStation Network, it could then be used to unlock many other online accounts – and potentially cause a bigger problem for you” (Cluley).

Carrns optimism seems to be unfounded, given that senior threat researcher, Kevin Stevens from the security firm Trend Micro, “said that the forums indicated the hackers had a database containing the personal information, and that they were hoping to sell it “for upwards of $100,000.” Apparently the hackers had even tried to sell the information back to Sony, but they didn’t receive a reply from the Japanese electronics company” (Mogg). I guess these are the rare hackers that prefer millions of dollars over notoriety.

How are users responding?

Some users have already begun to report  fraudulent charges on their credit and debit cards. One user  said that “a ticket was purchased through a German airline for nearly $600” leaving her with a negative account balance of $500 (Kuchera).

An Alabama user has already filed a class action suit against Sony in the 9th District court, asking among other things for monetary compensation and free credit card monitoring (Ogg) . The complaint asks for:

“1)An order certifying this case as a class action and appointing Plaintiff and his counsel to represent the Class.

2) Restitution and disgorgement of all amounts obtained by Defendant as a result of its misconduct, together with interest thereon from the date of payment, to the victims of such violations.

3) Actual damages for injuries suffered by Plaintiff and the Class.

4) Compensatory money damages according to proof.

5) Statutory damages according to proof.

6) An order requiring Defendant to immediately cease its wrongful conduct as set forth above; enjoining Defendant from continuing to falsely market and advertise, conceal material information and conduct business via the unlawful and unfair business acts and practices complained of herein; ordering Defendant to engage in a corrective notice campaign; and requiring Defendant to refund to Plaintiff and all members of the Class the funds paid to Defendant for the defective PlayStations and PSN services; ordering Defendant to pay for credit card monitoring for Plaintiff and all members of the Class.

7) Punitive damages.

8) Attorneys’ fees and costs.

9) For statutory prejudgment interest.

10) For such other relief as this Court may deem just and proper” (JOHNS v. SONY).

In short the complaint alleges that Sony did not take “reasonable care to protect, encrypt, and secure the private and sensitive data of its users” and that this precluded consumers from being able to make informed decisions about how to best mitigate the possible damages that could result from having their information stolen (Ogg; Clark).

Senators Dick Blumenthal, and Bobby Rush have both responded to the breach with press releases. Blumenthal berates Sony execs in a letter, for mishandling the breach and for failing to have adequate security precautions. Rush gets to the heart of the matter, and calls for Republican senators to work with democrats to get a bill passed that would require corporations to take better security precautions with users data (Blumenthal; Rush).

What repercussions will this have for Sony?

Sony will likely face staggering legal bills, not to mention that they will likely want to start placating  consumers financially, even before the suit is settled or tried (Clark). Whether or not gamers will vote Sony off the island by, is yet to be seen, but at least one journalist thinks they would be crazy not to. “… the gamer (and any sane consumer) also says this: If you are cavalier with my personal information I will punish you by walking away” (Schiesel).

References

Law & Social Justice — Recent Acquisitions

Agenda for a Sustainable America
edited by John C. Dernbach
HC79.E5 A358 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Assignment and Arbitration: A Comparative Study
Juan Carlos Landrove
K2400 .L36 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

At Home in the Law: How the Domestic Violence Revolution is Transforming Privacy
Jeannie Suk
KF9322 .S85 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Autonomy, Consent and the Law
Sheila A. M. McLean
K3611.I5 M38 2010
ThomCat |Amazon.com

The Challenge of Child Labour in International Law
Franziska Humbert
K1821 .H86 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Climate Change and the Law
Chris Wold, David Hunter, Melissa Powers
K3593 .W65 2009
ThomCat

Covering: The Hidden Assault on our Civil Rights
Kenji Yoshino
KF4749 .Y674 2007
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Does the Constitution Follow the Flag?: The Evolution of Territoriality in American Law
Kal Raustiala
KF413.J87 R38 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

The Evolution of the Fourth Amendment
Thomas N. McInnis
KF9630 .M35 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Freedom from Religion: Rights and National Security
Amos N. Guiora
K3258 .G85 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

The Gender of Reparations: Unsettling Sexual Hierarchies While Redressing Human
Rights Violations
edited by Ruth Rubio-Marin
K5301 .G46 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Global Democracy and Sustainable Jurisprudence: Deliberative Environmental Law
Walter F. Baber and Robert V. Bartlett
K3585 .B33 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Global Employee Privacy and Data Security Law
Morrison & Foerster LLP; editors Miriam H. Wugmeister and Christine E. Lyon
K3264.C65 G578 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Government by Contract: Outsourcing and American Democracy
edited by Jody Freeman, Martha Minow
HD3861.U6 G678 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

An Introduction to the American Legal System
John M. Scheb, John M. Scheb II.
KF385 .S34 2010
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Justice in Plainclothes: A Theory of American Constitutional Practice
Lawrence G. Sager
KF4550 .S235 2004
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Law and the Disordered: An Exploration in Mental Health, Law, and Politics
George C. Klein
KF3828 .K59 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat |Amazon.com

The Law of American State Constitutions
Robert F. Williams
KF4530 .W538 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Legal Studies: Terminology and Transcription
Wanda Roderick-Bolton
KF319 .R6 2004
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Mechanical Witness: A History of Motion Picture Evidence in U.S. Courts
Louis-Georges Schwartz
KF8725 .S39 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Mobilizing for Human Rights: International Law in Domestic Politics
Beth A. Simmons
K3240 .S5435 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Obstruction of Justice: Federal Statutes
Charles Doyle
KF9300 .D69 2008
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Private Lawyers and the Public Interest: The Evolving Role of Pro Bono in the
Legal Profession
edited by Robert Granfield, Lynn Mather
KF299.P8 P745 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Punishing Corporate Crime: Legal Penalties for Criminal and Regulatory
Violations
James T. O’Reilly et al.
KF9351 .P86 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Rediscovering Rhetoric: Law, Language, and the Practice of Persuasion
editors, Justin T. Gleeson, Ruth C.A. Higgins.
P301.5.P47 R43 2008
ThomCat

The Religious Left and Church-State Relations
Steven H. Shiffrin
KF4783 .S56 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat |Amazon.com

The Restitution of Cultural Assets: Causes of Action, Obstacles to Restitution,
Developments

Beat Schonenberger
K3791 .S36 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat |Amazon.com

A Right to Discriminate?: How the Case of Boy Scouts of America v. James Dale
Warped the Law of Free Association
Andrew Koppelman; with Tobias Barrington Wolff
KF4778 .K67 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Sexual Harassment: Prevention, Investigation and Litigation
Sound recording
State Bar of California
AUDIO KFC100.S49 S49 2009 (Lobby Display)
ThomCat

The South’s Role in the Creation of the Bill of Rights: Essays
Jack P. Greene et al.; edited by Robert J. Haws
KF4545.S5 S68 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Targeted Killing in International Law
Nils Melzer
KZ6362 .M45 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

US Pension Reform: Lessons from Other Countries
Martin Neil Baily, Jacob Funk Kirkegaard
HD7125 .B275 2009
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Women, Family, and Gender in Islamic Law
Judith E. Tucker
KBP526.3 .T83 2008
ThomCat |Amazon.com

Law, Technology & Communications – Recent Acquisitions

Autonomy, Consent and the Law
Sheila A. M. McLean
K3611.I5 M38 2010
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Challenge of Child Labour in International Law
Franziska Humbert
K1821 .H86 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Corporate Insider’s Guide to U.S. Patent Practice
Charles R. Macedo
KF3114.85 .M33 2010 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Global Employee Privacy and Data Security Law
Morrison & Foerster LLP; edited by Miriam H. Wugmeister and Christine E. Lyon
K3264.C65 G578 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Going Solo in Tough Economic Times
State Bar of California
AUDIO KFC77 .G65 2009 (Lobby Display)
ThomCat

The Handbook of European Intellectual Property Management : Developing, Managing and Protecting your Company’s Intellectual Property
Adam Jolly & Jeremy Philpott
KJE2636 .J65 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Hate on the Net: Extremist Sites, Neo-fascism On-line, Electronic Jihad
Antonio Roversi, Lawrence Smith
HT1521 .R69 2008
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Intellectual Property Law and Interactive Media: Free for a Fee
Edward Lee Lamoureux … [et al.]
KF3030.1 .I578 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Law and the Disordered: An Exploration in Mental Health, Law, and Politics
George C. Klein
KF3828 .K59 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The Law of Virtual Worlds and Internet Social Networks
Andrew Sparrow
KD667.C65 S68 2010 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Moral Panics and the Copyright Wars
William Patry
K1420.5 .P376 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

The National Security Court System: A Natural Evolution of Justice in an Age of
Terror
Glenn Sulmasy
KF9223 .S85 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Rediscovering Rhetoric: Law, Language, and the Practice of Persuasion
editors Justin T. Gleeson, Ruth C.A. Higgins
P301.5.P47 R43 2008
ThomCat

The Soul of Creativity: Forging a Moral Rights Law for the United States
Roberta Rosenthal Kwall
KF3012 .K85 2010
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Virtual Freedom: Net Neutrality and Free Speech in the Internet Age
Dawn C. Nunziato
KF4772 .N86 2009
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Who Owns You?: The Corporate Gold-rush to Patent your Genes
David Koepsell
K1519.B54 K64 2009 (New Book Shelf)
ThomCat | Amazon.com

Library Highlights: Law & the Internet

Virtual Freedom: Net Neutrality and Free Speech in the Internet Age
Dawn C. Nunziato
KF4772 .N86 2009
From the Publisher: Communications giants like Google, Comcast, and AT&T enjoy increasingly unchecked control over speech. As providers of broadband access and Internet search engines, they can control online expression. Their online content restrictions – from obstructing e-mail to censoring cablecasts – are considered legal because of recent changes in free speech law. In this book, Dawn Nunziato criticizes recent changes in free speech law in which only the government need refrain from censoring speech, while companies are permitted to self-regulate. By enabling Internet providers to exercise control over content, the Supreme Court and the FCC have failed to protect the public’s right to access a broad diversity of content.

Nunziato argues that regulation is necessary to ensure the free flow of information and to render the First Amendment meaningful in the twenty-first century. This book offers an urgent call to action, recommending immediate steps to preserve our free speech rights online.

The Law of Virtual Worlds and Internet Social Networks
Andrew Sparrow
KD667.C65 S68 2010
From the Publisher: Virtual worlds are the latest manifestation of the internet’s inexorable appetite for development. Organisations of all kinds are enthusiastically pursuing the commercial opportunities offered by the growth of this phenomenon. But if you believe that there are no laws which govern internet social networks and virtual worlds this book will persuade you otherwise. There is law, and a good deal of it. Why would there not be?

As with many other aspects of the world wide web, this new medium is unregulated and offers many opportunities for companies to damage their reputation, run into a whole host of problems relating to intellectual property, trade marks and copyrights, and compromise the rights of individuals participating within the virtual environment. By reading The Law of Virtual Worlds and Internet Social Networks you will gain a good understanding of the legal issues which govern this expanding and fascinating world – are you ready for the leap from internet plaything to meaningful social and business tool? [this book] is an essential reference for advertising and media agencies; television broadcast producers; academic institutions including university law, knowledge and information departments. In fact, it has been written for anyone interested in virtual worlds and social networks whether commercially because you want to explore the possibilities such environments present, or for academic curiosity.

Internet Law in a Nutshell
Michael L. Rustad
KF390.5.C6 R87 2009
From the Publisher: The book begins with a review of the history, technology, and competing theories of the Internet that enables a deeper understanding of case law and statutory developments discussed in the substantive chapters. It covers the history of the Internet through the rapidly evolving Web 3.0, competing theories of Internet governance, cyber jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, choice and conflicts of law, cybertorts, online contracting and licensing, the protection of online intellectual property assets, the protection of online privacy, criminal liability for Internet activity, and European Community directives such as the E-Commerce Directive, Brussels Regulation, and Rome I Regulation.

In Search of Jefferson’s Moose: Notes on the State of Cyberspace
David G. Post
K564.C6 P67 2009
From the Publisher: In 1787, Thomas Jefferson, then the American Minister to France, had the “complete skeleton, skin & horns” of an American moose shipped to him in Paris and mounted in the lobby of his residence as a symbol of the vast possibilities contained in the strange and largely unexplored New World. Taking a cue from Jefferson’s efforts, David Post, one of the nation’s leading Internet scholars, here presents a pithy, colorful exploration of the still mostly undiscovered territory of cyberspace–what it is, how it works, and how it should be governed.

What law should the Internet have, and who should make it? What are we to do, and how are we to think, about online filesharing and copyright law, about Internet pornography and free speech, about controlling spam, and online gambling, and cyberterrorism, and the use of anonymous remailers, or the practice of telemedicine, or the online collection and dissemination of personal information? How can they be controlled?

Should they be controlled? And by whom? Post presents the Jeffersonian ideal–small selfgoverning units, loosely linked together as peers in groups of larger and larger size–as a model for the Internet and for cyberspace community self-governance. Deftly drawing on Jefferson’s writings on the New World in Notes on the State of Virginia , Post draws out the many similarities (and differences) between the two terrains, vividly describing how the Internet actually functions from a technological, legal, and social perspective as he uniquely applies Jefferson’s views on natural history, law, and governance in the New World to illuminate the complexities of cyberspace.

E-Commerce and Internet Law: Treatise with Forms
Ian C. Ballon
KF390.5.C6 B35 2009
From the Publisher: The revised and updated edition of this comprehensive work provides you with a complete legal authority on e-commerce and Internet law, covering business-to-business and business-to-customer issues, regulatory issues, and emerging trends. It includes practice tips and forms and its unique organization facilitates finding quick answers to your questions. This valuable resource on Internet and ecommerce issues contains nearly 10,000 detailed footnotes, plus references to more than 100 unpublished court decisions, many of which are not available anywhere else.

Privacy and the Internet: Your Expectations and Rights under the Law
Revised and updated by Margaret C. Jasper
KF1263.C65 J38 2009
From the Publisher: The Internet is the most significant medium of both commercial and financial communications and transactions. It has become the nation’s primary vehicle for the exchange of news, mail, and general information. Unfortunately, these benefits often expose Internet users to serious privacy risks which may have catastrophic results. Thus, it is crucial that Internet users understand how to safely and securely “surf the net,” without exposing themselves to criminal activities which infringe on their privacy.

This almanac discusses some of the most important security methods, including the effective use of passwords, utilizing virus software, installing firewalls, understanding encryption technology, and being vigilant about the type of information one shares on the Internet. Internet identity theft is also addressed.

In addition, this fully revised publication outlines Internet privacy policies and applicable laws placed upon various entities designed to protect private information of Internet users. A discussion of online privacy protection for children, which encompasses the governing laws are included. Finally, this almanac sets forth the role of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in enforcing privacy rights, including a review of some of the major enforcement cases brought by the FTC. The Appendix provides resource directories, applicable statutes, and other pertinent information and data. The Glossary contains definitions of the terms used throughout the almanac.

Library Highlights – Law & Bioethics

The Nexus of Law and Biology: New Ethical Challenges
edited by Barbara Ann Hocking
K328 .N494 2009
From the Publisher: Although law and science have interacted for centuries, today their interactions pose enormous challenges. These challenges are reflected in issues ranging from reproductive technology and resource conservation, to genetic technology and biological warfare.

The emerging dialogue is complex and requires an ongoing re-thinking of general principles, such as expert biological evidence, which features in a wide range of legal contexts, and including medical law, torts, crime and intellectual property.

Studying the many ways in which law and biology come together in many areas of contemporary life, The Nexus of Law and Biology: New Ethical Challenges explores the juridical uses of biological sciences to illuminate key issues and contemporary intersections, arguing that each of several disciplines must communicate with one another, recognizing a common ground in ethics. Featuring an impressive list of contributors, this book is an invaluable reference for legal scholars, students, practising lawyers and scientists engaged with the legal system.

Bioethics and Law in a Nutshell
Sandra H. Johnson and Robert L. Schwartz
KF3821 .J64 2009
From the Publisher: This work provides a concise analysis of areas in which the law has addressed issues in bioethics. Topics include assisted reproductive techniques and family-making, limitations on reproduction (including abortion, contraception, and sterilization), the role of ethical and religious beliefs of health care professionals, the definition of death, end-of-life decision making (including physician-assisted death), genetics, research involving human subjects (including issues related to conflicts of interest), organ transplantation, limitations on coercive public health regulation, the operation of ethics committees, and other emerging topics. The book provides an excellent introduction to this area as well as useful support for students.

Bioethics: Health Care Law and Ethics
Barry R. Furrow et al.
KF3821.A7 B56 2008
From the Publisher: This book provides a rich body of materials for courses in bioethics and law. Primary legal sources, including judicial opinions, statutes, regulations, and institutional policies, will give students insight into the strategies used by courts, legislatures, agencies, and health care providers in addressing bioethics issues. The book also draws from interdisciplinary research in medicine, ethics, and law to provide students with diverse critiques of legal and public policy issues in bioethics. This edition includes a selection of new problems; completely updated notes and bibliographies; and new or expanded treatment of issues that have come to prominence since the previous edition.

Legal Perspectives in Bioethics
edited by Ana S. Iltis, Sandra H. Johnson and Barbara A. Hinze
KF3821 .L445 2008
From the Publisher: Issues in bioethics often turn, at least in part, on the law and regulatory requirements. Consisting of chapters that address particular bioethics topics from the law’s perspective, this fascinating book includes: an introduction to the American legal system, papers identifying the principal ways in which the law influences discussions and decisions concerning each of the topics highlighted, supplemental papers on certain areas that address the influence and status of the law in countries other than the United States.

Covering traditional topics in bioethics, such as determinations of death and health care decisions for vulnerable groups, this study also explores emerging areas such as conflicts of interest in research, genetics, and privacy and confidentiality in the electronic age. Incisive and thought-provoking, this volume provides readers with a rich context for understanding the intersection between the law on bioethics and the central issues in bioethics.

Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Law and Ethics
Dean M. Harris
KF3825 .H373 2008
From the Publisher: Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Law and Ethics, Third Edition, examines the most important legal and ethical issues in healthcare and presents essential information that will help you learnto identify and tackle potential legal problems.

This edition includes new information and extensive updates including: The U.S. Supreme Court’s decisions on physician-assisted suicide, the liability of health plans, and partial-birth abortion, Legal and ethical issues in emergency contraception, The Terri Schiavo case involving termination of life support, The Medicare prescription drug benefit and HIPAA Privacy Rule, Medical malpractice reform and the reporting of medical errors, Obligations to provide emergency care and make services accessible to persons with limited English proficiency, A new chapter on health insurance and the ongoing effort to achieve universal health insurance coverage. This new edition also has a revised emphasis and focus. Rather than focusing on managed care, it emphasizes, and includes more material on, health insurance reform.

Retrieving the Natural Law: A Return to Moral First Things
J. Daryl Charles
K420 .C33 2008
From the Publisher: Restating what all people intuit and what this means in moral, specifically bioethical, discourse is the raison d’être for this volume. J. Daryl Charles argues that a traditional metaphysics of natural law lies at the heart of the present reconstructive project, and that a revival in natural-law thinking is of the highest priority for the Christian community as we contend in, rather than abdicate, the public square.

Nowhere is this more on display than in the realm of bioethics, where the most basic moral questions human personhood, human rights versus responsibilities, the reality of moral evil, the basis of civil society — are being debated. With his timely application of natural-law thinking to the field of bioethics, Charles seeks to breathe new life back into this key debate.

Recent Acquisitions Spotlight

global-warming-for-dummies1Global Warming for Dummies

QC 981.8 .G56 M39 2009

Understand global warming and what you can do to make a positive difference!  Fiercely debated in the political arena and constantly splashed across the media, global warming is a hot topic.  Global Warming For Dummies sorts out fact from fiction, explaining the science behind climate change and examining the possible long-term effects of a warmer planet.  This friendly guide helps readers explore solutions to this challenging problem, from what governments and industry can do to what readers can do at home and how to get involved.
Open the book and find:
1.  How human activity is altering Earth’s atmosphere
2.  What could happen when polar ice melts
3.  Which species could disappear if global warming continues
4.  Carbon-reduction success stories from around the world
5.  What the Kyoto Protocol is and what it means
6.  How the sun, wind, earth, and ocean can all provide clean sources of energy
7.  You can fight global warming by hopping on a bike or painting your roof white
©2009 John Wiley & Sons, Canada.

bodiescrimesOur Bodies, Our Crimes: The Policing of Women’s Reproduction in America

HQ 1236.5 .U6 F532 2009

Jeanne Flavin reviews the ways in which women’s reproductive rights and criminal justice intersect.  She argues that the way in which the criminal justice system disciplines women’s reproductive behavior maintains the notion that women’s value derives mainly from their sexuality and reproductive capacity, and that the consequences of official attempts to restrict reproductive freedom have a much more profound effect on women than of men.  The book is divided into three parts that deal with the begetting, bearing and mothering of children.  Chapters include: “The Right to Procreate”; “Terminating the Pregnancies”; “Neonaticide and Infant Abandonment”; “Fetal Protectionism and Pregnant Women”; “Incarcerated Women’s Right to Reproductive Health”; “Incarcerated Women’s Right to Their Children”; and “Battered Women and Child Custody.”

Court Allows Attorney To Serve Documents Using FaceBook

In an interesting legal development that reflects the pervasiveness of “Web 2.0″ social networking sites,  an Australian court last month approved the use of Facebook for serving a foreclosure notice to a couple defaulting on a mortgage.  Mark McCormack of Canberra law firm Meyer Vandenberg, the attorney for the lender and an avid Facebook user, told the Australian Capital Territory Supreme Court that repeated attempts to serve documents at the homeowners’ last known physical address had failed.  He used the email address given on the loan application to search Facebook and discovered a page with matching personal information.  The firm issued a press release and the story was picked up by the Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times among others.