Category Archives: U.S. Supreme Court

Library Highlights: Law & Politics

Race, Reform, and Regulation of the Electoral Process: Recurring Puzzles in American Democracy

Guy-Uriel E. Charles (Editor), Heather K. Gerken (Editor), Michael S. Kang

KF4891 .R33 2011

From the Publisher: This book offers a critical re-evaluation of three fundamental and interlocking themes in American democracy: the relationship between race and politics, the performance and reform of election systems, and the role of courts in regulating the political process. This edited volume features contributions from some of the leading voices in election law and social science.

Big Girls Don’t Cry: The Election That Changed Everything for American Women

Rebecca Traister

JK276 2008 .T73 2010

From the Publisher: RebeccaTraister, whose coverage of the 2008 presidential election for Salon confirmed her to be a gifted cultural observer, offers a startling appraisal of what the campaign meant for all of us. Though the election didn’t give us our first woman president or vice president, the exhilarating campaign was nonetheless transformative for American women and for the nation. In Big Girls Don’t Cry, her electrifying, incisive and highly entertaining first book, Traister tells a terrific story and makes sense of a moment in American history that changed the country’s narrative in ways that no one anticipated.

America Votes!: A Guide to Modern Election Law and Voting Rights

Editor-Benjamin E. Griffith

KF4886 .A86 2008

From the Publisher: Provides a snapshot of America’s voting and electoral practices, problems, and most current issues. The book was edited and written by widely knowledgeable practitioners who explore a variety of fundamental areas concerning election law from a federal perspective such as:Lessons learned from the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections, Meeting the demand of a growing language-minority voting populate, How the government, poll workers, political parties, and nonpartisan advocates can work together to ensure smooth election administration, Felon disenfranchisement, Voting technology and the law, etc..

The Battle Over Bilingual Ballots: Election Law, Politics, and Theory

James Thomas Tucker

KF4896.L56 T83 2009

From the Publisher: This book describes the evolution of the provisions, examining the evidence of educational and voting discrimination against language minorities covered by the Act. Additional chapters discuss the debate over the 2006 amendments to the Voting Rights Act, analysis of objections raised by opponents of bilingual ballots and some of the most controversial components of these requirements, including their constitutionality, cost and effectiveness. Featuring revealing case studies as well as analysis of key data, this volume makes a persuasive and much-needed case for bilingual ballots, presenting a thorough investigation of this significant and understudied area of election law and American political life.

The Supreme Court and Elections: The Supreme Court’s Power in American Politics

Charles Zelden

KF4886 .Z45 2010

From the Publisher: Taking a chronological approach to the topic, The Supreme Court and Elections explores the ways that the Court has struggled with these questions. From the earliest days of the Union when the Supreme Court refused to address the topic, to the early struggles with the Fourteenth Amendment’s impact on the question of who can vote, to the rise and fall of race-based disenfranchisement, to our recent issues of proper districting, campaign finance reform and the struggle to find a workable voting technology, the essay and documents in this reference illuminate the multifaceted nature of voting and election laws.

Showdown: The Inside Story of How Obama Fought Back Against Boehner, Cantor, and the Tea Party

David Corn

E908.3 .C67 2012

From the Publisher: Veteran journalist David CornWashington Bureau Chief for Mother Jones magazine and New York Times bestselling author of Hubris (with Michael Isikoff) and The Lies of George W. Bush now brings us, “Showdown”, the dramatic inside story of Barack Obamas fight to save his presidency.

U.S. Supreme Court News: Health-Care Reform Bill case

May the Supreme Court accept a case to determine the constitutionality of the Health Care Bill, where there is still a pending case on this issue in the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals?

Virginia Attorney General Kenneth Cuccinelli has asked the Supreme Court to hear a direct appeal of the federal case on the Constitutionality of the implementation of the health-care law. The Obama administration is urging the 4th Circuit Court of appeals to reverse the ruling that the health-care law is unconstitutional. The Department of Justice has filed a motion with the Supreme Court requesting that the Court wait for the 4th Circuit decision before deciding on this matter.

In response, Cuccinelli has filed a brief to try to convince the Supreme Court to hear the case before it goes to the Fourth Circuit. The case, Commonwealth of Virginia v. Kathleen Sebelius, is scheduled to be heard May 10 in the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

On April 15, the U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to discuss Cuccinelli’s petition for the Supreme Court to hear the lawsuit and to bypass appellate court review.

Update: The Supreme Court decided not to hear the case.

“JULIE ROVNER: It’s pretty rare for the high court to agree to take a case directly from a trial court.

Professor TIMOTHY JOST (Washington and Lee University Law School): The case has to be of, quote, “such imperative public importance,” unquote, that it requires immediate determination in this court.

ROVNER: Timothy Jost is a law professor at Washington and Lee University Law School in Lexington, Virginia. He says the Court usually limits such expedited cases to those involving foreign relations, national security or national crises” (Rovner).

References

Library Highlights: Election Law

The Supreme Court and Elections: Into the Political Thicket

Charles L. Zelden

KF4886 .Z45 2010

From the Publisher: Voting is simple in the United States, right? The process of voting (organizing, running and tabulating the results of a popular election) is, in fact, a highly contested act whose forms, meanings, and practical boundaries are open to widely differing interpretations. From questions of who can vote to the tricky problem of accurately counting the votes, popular democracy is still a work in progress in the United States. Add in the complexities of politics and the picture becomes even more complicated. Taking a chronological approach to the topic, The Supreme Court and Elections explores the ways that the Court has struggled with these questions. From the earliest days of the Union when the Supreme Court refused to address the topic, to the early struggles with the Fourteenth Amendment’s impact on the question of who can vote, to the rise and fall of race-based disenfranchisement, to our recent issues of proper districting, campaign finance reform and the struggle to find a workable voting technology, the essay and documents in this reference illuminate the multifaceted nature of voting and election laws. At the same time, this title provides in-depth analysis of the impact of the Court in shaping this ongoing history.

Notes from the Cracked Ceiling: Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin, and What it will Take for a Woman to Win

Anne E. Kornblut

HQ1236.5.U6 K67 2009

From the Publisher: In a probing analysis sure to ignite controversy, acclaimed White House correspondent Anne Kornblut argues that the optimists are blind to formidable obstacles that still stand in the way of any woman who aims for America’s highest political offices. And she makes clear exactly which strategies and common assumptions will need to change if a woman intends to break through the “highest, hardest glass ceiling” of all. Delving deep inside the Clinton and Palin campaigns, Kornblut reveals: the strategists’ mishandling of their candidates as women by failing to strike the right balance between femininity and toughness; Clinton’s weathering of a series of stinging genderbased attacks, until accusations of “pimping out” her daughter, Chelsea, finally brought her to tears; that Barack Obama was celebrated for his “historic”win in Iowa, even though it was not the first time an African American had won a caucus, but few noticed when Clinton became the first woman to win a primary in New Hampshire; that Palin was chosen solely by men, none of whom had experience in running women for office […]. Kornblut identifies the surprising realities of gender politics, such as the harsh treatment female candidates often receive from women voters, the gap between the United States and other countries when it comes to the electability of women, the “mommy penalty” that handicaps women candidates with young children, and the special appeal that women with law enforcement backgrounds have with voters.

The Battle over Bilingual Ballots: The Language Minorities and Political Access under the Voting Rights Act

James Thomas Tucker

KF4896.L56 T83 2009

From the Publisher: In recent years, few federal requirements have been as controversial as the mandate for what critics call ‘bilingual ballots’. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 included a permanent requirement for language assistance for Puerto Rican voters educated in Spanish and ten years later Congress banned English-only elections in certain covered jurisdictions, expanding the support to include Alaska Natives, American Indians, Asian-language voters and Spanish-language voters. Some commentators have condemned the language assistance provisions, underlying many of their attacks with anti-immigrant rhetoric. Although the provisions have been in effect for over three decades, until now no comprehensive study of them has been published. This book describes the evolution of the provisions, examining the evidence of educational and voting discrimination against language minorities covered by the Act. Additional chapters discuss the debate over the 2006 amendments to the Voting Rights Act, analysis of objections raised by opponents of bilingual ballots and some of the most controversial components of these requirements, including their constitutionality, cost and effectiveness. Featuring revealing case studies as well as analysis of key data, this volume makes a persuasive and much-needed case for bilingual ballots, presenting a thorough investigation of this significant and understudied area of election law and American political life.

The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States

Alexander Keyssar

JK1846 .K48 2009

From the Publisher: Originally published in 2000, The Right to Vote was widely hailed as a magisterial account of the evolution of suffrage from the American Revolution to the end of the twentieth century. In this revised and updated edition, Keyssar carries the story forward, from the disputed presidential contest of 2000 through the 2008 campaign and the election of Barack Obama. The Right to Vote is a sweeping reinterpretation of American political history as well as a meditation on the meaning of democracy in contemporary American life.

First Presidential Messages: Two Hundred Twenty Years of Inaugural Addresses and Statements on Becoming President, 1789-2009

edited by George N. Otey

J81.4 .F577 2009

From the Publisher: First Presidential Messages is a unique historical collection of presentations made upon becoming the nation’s chief executive. This compilation presents not only the traditional inaugural addresses but also the little-known remarks given by Vice Presidents when assuming the higher office. As the nation marks the two hundred twentieth anniversary of the U.S. Presidency, it is inspiring and enlightening to read the comments of each President, from George Washington in 1789 to Barack Obama in 2009. While First Presidential Messages reveals a uniformity of focus on the Founders vision of self-government, some presidential speeches are so artfully crafted that they rank among the world s greatest; especially Lincoln s second inaugural, FDR s first inaugural, Eisenhower s first inaugural, and Kennedy s inaugural. More than historical curiosities, these presidential speeches transcend time and present a continued call for national unity, an appeal to surpass the leadership of the past and a challenge to actively and creatively work through the issues of the day so as to safeguard civil liberties and leave the nation, and the world, a better place. This 368 page hardbound volume is both a general research tool and a citizen s companion that will provide the reader with a sense of pride in the genius of our Founding Fathers and the political system they created to protect the values of the American Revolution.

Library Highlights: Native American Law

Introduction to Tribal legal Studies

Justin B. Richland and Sarah Deer

KF8205 .R53 2010

From the Publisher: This second edition of Introduction to Tribal Legal Studies is the only available comprehensive introduction to tribal law. In clear and straightforward language, Justin B. Richland and Sarah Deer discuss the history and structure of tribal justice systems; the scope of criminal and civil jurisdictions; and the various means by which the integrity of tribal courts is maintained. This book is an indispensable resource for students, tribal leaders, and tribal communities interested in the complicated relationship between tribal, federal, and state law. The second edition provides significant updates on all changes in laws affecting the tribes, numerous new case studies (including studies on Alaskan tribes and family law), and a new concluding chapter.

Children, Tribes, and States: Adoption and Custody Conflicts over American Indian Children

Barbara Ann Atwood

KF8210.C45 A98 2010

From the Publisher: Children, Tribes, and States offers a multi-layered critique of Indian child welfare law. The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA) provides the governing law and reflects the prevailing federal policy. Three decades after its enactment, the law remains controversial. On one hand, Atwood agrees that many state courts still resist ICWA’s jurisdictional provisions because of distrust of tribes and tribal courts. These jurisdictional battles not only deter the courts from addressing the merits of the children’s cases but also prolong the children’s stay in temporary care. On the other hand, she argues that when a state court decides the placement of an Indian child, it must take into account the child’s individual needs. The book explores alternative placements that may conform to the culture of a child’s tribe, such as customary adoption and kinship guardianships. Atwood proposes reforms that aim to protect the children’s well-being while fitting with contemporary understandings of tribal sovereignty and the promotion of cultural identity.

Navajo Courts and Navajo Common Law: A Tradition of Tribal Self-Governance Raymond D. Austin

KF8228.N3 A95 2009

From the Publisher: The Navajo Nation court system is the largest and most established tribal legal system in the world. Since the landmark 1959 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Williams v. Lee that affirmed tribal court authority over reservation-based claims, the Navajo Nation has been at the vanguard of a far-reaching, transformative jurisprudential movement among Indian tribes in North America and indigenous peoples around the world to retrieve and use traditional values to address contemporary legal issues. A justice on the Navajo Nation Supreme Court for sixteen years, Justice Raymond D. Austin has been deeply involved in the movement to develop tribal courts and tribal law as effective means of modern self-government. He has written foundational opinions that have established Navajo common law and, throughout his legal career, has recognized the benefit of tribal customs and traditions as tools of restorative justice. In Navajo Courts and Navajo Common Law, Justice Austin considers the history and implications of how the Navajo Nation courts apply foundational Navajo doctrines to modern legal issues. He explains key Navajo foundational concepts like Hózhó (harmony), K’é (peacefulness and solidarity), and K’éí (kinship) both within the Navajo cultural context and, using the case method of legal analysis, as they are adapted and applied by Navajo judges in virtually every important area of legal life in the tribe. In addition to detailed case studies, Justice Austin provides a broad view of tribal law, documenting the development of tribal courts as important institutions of indigenous self-governance and outlining how other indigenous peoples, both in North America and elsewhere around the world, can draw on traditional precepts to achieve self-determination and self-government, solve community problems, and control their own futures.

Broken Landscape: Indian Tribes and the Constitution

Frank Pommersheim

KF8205 .P63 2009

From the Publisher: Broken Landscape is a sweeping chronicle of Indian tribal sovereignty under the United States Constitution and the way that legal analysis and practice have interpreted and misinterpreted tribal sovereignty since the nation’s founding. The Constitution formalized the relationship between Indian tribes and the United States government–a relationship forged through a long history of war and land usurpation–within a federal structure not mirrored in the traditions of tribal governance. Although the Constitution recognized the sovereignty of Indian nations, it did not safeguard tribes against the tides of national expansion and exploitation. As [this title] demonstrates, the federal government has repeatedly failed to respect the Constitution’s recognition of tribal sovereignty. Instead, it has favored excessive, unaccountable authority in its dealings with tribes. The Supreme Court has strayed from its Constitutional roots as well, consistently issuing decisions over two centuries that have bolstered federal power over the tribes.

Facing the Future: The Indian Child Welfare Act at 30

edited by Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Wenona T. Singel, and Kathryn E. Fort

KF8210.C45 F33 2009

From the Publisher: This is a comprehensive evaluation of well-intentioned but problematic federal legislation: The U.S. Congress is charged with responsibility for the protection and preservation of American Indian tribes, including Indian children. In 1978, Congress enacted the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), with the intent to “protect the best interests of Indian children and to promote the stability and security of Indian tribes and families.” ICWA sets federal requirements that apply to state child custody proceedings involving an Indian child who is a member of or eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe. ICWA also sets out federal requirements regarding removal of Indian children and their placement in foster or adoptive homes, and it allows the child’s tribe to intervene in the case. The history of the Act is a tangle of legal, social, and emotional complications. Some state courts have found unusual legal arguments to avoid applying the law, while some states have gone beyond the terms of the Act to provide greater protections for Indian people. This collection brings together for the first time a multidisciplinary assessment of the law — with scholars, practitioners, lawyers, and social workers all offering perspectives on the value and importance of the Indian Child Welfare Act.

The Supreme Court’s Role in American Indian Policy

John H. Vinzant

KF8205 .V56 2009

From the Publisher: Vinzant demonstrates how the Supreme Court has been effective at shaping American Indian policy in the areas of tribal sovereignty and the trust responsibility. He explains how the Court, has been able to be very active in stripping away tribal sovereignty while Congress has responded to restrain the Court. Vinzant introduces the idea of effectiveness in judicial policymaking and argues that the Court has been highly effective in making American Indian policy. Vinzant demonstrates how the Supreme Court has been effective at shaping American Indian policy in the areas of tribal sovereignty and the trust responsibility. He explains how the Court, has been able to be very active in stripping away tribal sovereignty while Congress has responded to restrain the Court. Vinzant introduces the idea of effectiveness in judicial policymaking and argues that the Court has been highly effective in making American Indian policy.

McDonald v. Chicago

U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments were held today in McDonald v. Chicago, a potentially landmark case concerning guns rights and regulations. Find the oral arguments transcript here.

Read what some of the legal pundits have to say following today’s oral arguments at the WSJ Law Blog, NYT, and SCOTUSblog.

Click here for more coverage of the case by SCOTUSwiki, including links to the briefs and more commentary.

Check out the TJSL Library Display of materials related to the case just to the right of the circulation desk (pictured above).

Here’s a brief summary of the case thus far from wikipedia:

McDonald v. Chicago is a lawsuit originally filed before the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, and for which a petition for certiorari was granted on Sept. 30, 2009, by the Supreme Court of the United States. The petitioners seek to overturn a handgun ban, and other aspects of gun registration regulations affecting rifles and shotguns, in Chicago, Illinois as unconstitutional. This was the first such lawsuit since the landmark Supreme Court ruling in District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), which held that the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution protected an individual right to “keep and bear arms.” The case was filed by Alan Gura, who successfully argued Heller, and Chicago-area attorney David G. Sigale. The case is sponsored by the Second Amendment Foundation and the Illinois State Rifle Association on behalf of several Chicago residents, including retiree Otis McDonald.

The trial court entered judgment in favor of the City of Chicago on December 18, 2008. The decision was appealed to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and combined with a similar case, NRA v. Chicago. Oral argument was May 26, 2009, and the court issued its opinion on June 2, 2009, affirming the trial court’s decision that the Chicago and Oak Park gun regulations pass constitutional muster.

The Second Amendment Foundation appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court for certiorari on behalf of their plaintiffs. Certiorari for McDonald was granted on September 30, 2009.  Oral arguments are scheduled for March 2, 2010. The NRA has separately filed on behalf of their plaintiffs, and on January 25, 2010 the Supreme Court granted the NRA’s motion for divided argument.

Wikipedia ©2010. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McDonald_v._Chicago

Library Highlights: GLBT Rights

California Supreme Court Oral Arguments: Proposition 8 Same-Sex Marriage March 5, 2009. California. Supreme Court
VIDEO KFC129 .C257 2009
From the Publisher: The California Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Thursday, March 5, 2009, in three cases challenging the constitutionality of Proposition 8 (Ban on Same Sex Marriage) , a statewide ballot initiative that was passed by a majority of California voters in November 2008.

When Gay People get Married: What Happens when Societies Legalize Same-Sex Marriage
M.V. Lee Badgett
K699 .B33 2009
From the Publisher: […] In order to find out the impact of same-sex marriage, M. V. Lee Badgett traveled to a land where it has been legal for same-sex couples to marry since 2001: the Netherlands. Badgett interviews gay couples to find out how this step has affected their lives. We learn about the often surprising changes to their relationships, the reactions of their families, and work  colleagues. Moreover, Badgett is interested in the ways that the institution itself has been altered for the larger society. How has the concept of marriage changed? When Gay People Get Married gives readers a primer on the current state of the same-sex marriage debate, and a new way of framing the issue that provides valuable new insights into the political, social, and personal stakes involved.

The experiences of other countries and these pioneering American states serve as a crystal ball as we grapple with this polarizing issue in the American context. The evidence shows both that marriage changes gay people more than gay people change marriage, and that it is the most liberal countries and states making the first move to recognize gay couples. In the end, Badgett compellingly shows that allowing gay couples to marry does not destroy the institution of marriage and that many gay couples do benefit, in expected as well as surprising ways, from the legal, social, and political rights that the institution offers.

Constitutional Rights, Moral Controversy, and the Supreme Court
Michael J. Perry
KF8748 .P39 2009
From the Publisher: In this important new book, Michael J. Perry examines three of the most disputed constitutional issues of our time: capital punishment, state laws banning abortion, and state policies denying the benefit of law to same-sex unions. The author, a leading constitutional scholar, explains that if a majority of the justices of the Supreme Court believes that a law violates the Constitution, it does not necessarily follow that the Court should rule that the law is unconstitutional. In cases in which it is argued that a law violates the Constitution, the Supreme Court must decide which of two importantly different questions it should address: (1) Is the challenged law unconstitutional? (2) Is the lawmakers’ judgment that the challenged law is constitutional a reasonable judgment? (One can answer both questions in the affirmative.) By focusing on the death penalty, abortion, and same-sex unions, Perry provides illuminating new perspectives not only on moral controversies that implicate one or more constitutionally entrenched human rights, but also on the fundamental question of the Supreme Court’s proper role in adjudicating such controversies.

Queer Mobilizations: LGBT Activists Confront the Law
edited by Scott Barclay, Mary Bernstein, and Anna-Maria Marshall
KF4754.5 .Q84 2009
From the Publisher: Fighting for marriage and family rights; protection from discrimination in employment, education, and housing; criminal law reform; economic justice; and health care reform: the LGBT movement is engaged in some of the most important cultural and political battles of our times. Seeking to reshape many of our basic social institutions, the LBGT movement’s legal, political, and cultural campaigns reflect the complex visions, strategies, and rhetoric of the individuals and groups knocking at the law’s door. The original essays in this volume bring social movement scholarship and legal analysis together, enriching our understanding of social movements, LGBT politics and organizing, legal studies, and public policy. Moreover, they highlight the struggle to make the law relevant and responsive to the LGBT community. Ultimately, Queer Mobilizations examines how the LGBT movement’s engagement with the law shapes the very meanings of sexuality, sex, gender, privacy, discrimination, and family in law and society.

Courting Change: Queer Parents, Judges, and the Transformation of American Family Law
Kimberly D. Richman
KF540 .R53 2009
From the Publisher: A lesbian couple rears a child together and, after the biological mother dies, the surviving partner loses custody to the child’s estranged biological father. Four days later, in a different court, judges rule on the side of the partner, because they feel the child relied on the woman as a psychological parent. What accounts for this inconsistency regarding gay and lesbian adoption and custody cases, and why has family law failed to address them in a comprehensive manner? In Courting Change, Kimberly D. Richman zeros in on the nebulous realm of family law, one of the most indeterminate and discretionary areas of American law. She focuses on judicial decisions—both the outcomes and the rationales—and what they say about family, rights, sexual orientation, and who qualifies as a parent. Richman challenges prevailing notions that gay and lesbian parents and families are hurt by laws’ indeterminacy, arguing that, because family law is so loosely defined, it allows for the flexibility needed to respond to — and even facilitate — changes in how we conceive of family, parenting, and the role of sexual orientation in family law.

Drawing on every recorded judicial decision in gay and lesbian adoption and custody cases over the last fifty years, and on interviews with parents, lawyers, and judges, Richman demonstrates how parental and sexual identities are formed and interpreted.

Same-Sex Marriage and Religious Liberty: Emerging Conflicts
edited by Douglas Laycock, Anthony R. Picarello, Jr., and Robin Fretwell Wilson
BL462 .S36 2008
From the Publisher: [This title] explores two principal questions. First, exactly what kind of religious freedom conflicts are likely to emerge if society embraces same-sex marriage? A redefinition of marriage would impact a host of laws where marital status affects legal rights—in housing, employment, healthcare, education, public accommodations, and property, in addition to family law. These laws, in turn, regulate a host of religious institutions—schools, hospitals, and social service providers, to name a few—that often embrace a different definition of marriage. As a result, church-state conflicts will follow. This volume anticipates where and how these manifold disputes will arise. Second, how might these conflicts be resolved? If the disputes spark litigation under the Free Speech, Free Exercise, or Establishment Clauses of the First Amendment, who will prevail and why? When, if ever, should claims of religious liberty prevail over claims of sexual liberty? Drawing on experience in analogous areas of law, the volume explores whether it is possible to avoid these constitutional conflicts by statutory accommodation, or by separating religious marriage from civil marriage.

Law & Social Justice — Recent Acquisitions

Adjudicating Climate Change: State, National, and International Approaches
edited by William C.G. Burns, Hari M. Osofsky
K3593 .A93 2009 (New Book Shelf)
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Beyond Accommodation: Ethical Feminism, Deconstruction, and the Law
Drucilla Cornell
HQ1190 .C67 1991
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The Confluence of Public and Private International Law: Justice, Pluralism and Subsidiarity in the International Constitutional Ordering of Private Law
Alex Mills
K7040 .M55 2009
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The Crimes of Womanhood: Defining Femininity in a Court of Law
A. Cheree Carlson
KF4758 .C365 2009 (Course Reserve)
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Environmental Justice: Law, Policy & Regulation
Clifford Rechtschaffen, Eileen Gauna, Catherine A. O’Neill
KF3775 .R385 2009
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Experimenting with the Consumer: The Mass Testing of Risky Products on the American Public
Marshall S. Shapo
KF1296 .S428 2009 (Course Reserve)
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Global Standards–Local Action: 15 Years Vienna World Conference on Human Rights: Conference Proceedings of the International Expert Conference held in Vienna on 28 and 29 August 2008
edited by Wolfgang Bendek et al.
K3239.8 .G56 2009
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A Good Quarrel: America’s Top Legal Reporters Share Stories from Inside the Supreme Court
edited by Timothy R. Johnson and Jerry Goldman
KF8742 .G66 2009 (Course Reserve)
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Human Rights and the Alien Tort Statute: Law, History, and Analysis
Peter Henner
KF1309.5 .H46 2009 (New Book Shelf)
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Human Rights as Indivisible Rights: The Protection of Socio-economic Demands under the European Convention on Human Rights
Ida Elisabeth Koch
KJC5132 .K63 2009
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International Children’s Rights
Sara Dillon
K639 .D555 2010
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The International Law of Economic Migration: Toward the Fourth Freedom
Joel P. Trachtman
K3275 .T73 2009 (Course Reserve)
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Law’s Allure: How Law Shapes, Constrains, Saves, and Kills Politics
Gordon Silverstein
KF5130 .S55 2009 (Course Reserve)
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Pharmaceutical Industry Antitrust Handbook
KF3885 .P53 2009 (New Book Shelf)
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Principles of Criminal Procedure: Investigation
Wayne R. Lafave et al.
KF9660 .L348 2009
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Protecting the Oceans beyond National Jurisdiction: Strengthening the International Law Framework
Robin Warner
K3485 .W37 2009
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The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment: Judging Death
Michael E. Parrish
KF9227.C2 P37 2010
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